Kabir Bhatia

Kabir Bhatia joined WKSU as a Reporter/Producer and weekend host in 2010.  A graduate of Hudson High School, he received his Bachelor's from Kent State University.  While a Kent student, Bhatia served as a WKSU student assistant, working in the newsroom and for production.

Among his awards, he was named Best of Show – Best Reporter in Ohio for 2013 by the Ohio chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

People who live near Blossom Music Center in Cuyahoga Falls may soon have some relief from traffic caused by concerts with a new city-issued car pass.

Blossom had previously issued passes that would hang from rearview mirrors, alerting deputies that they should let nearby residents proceed around traffic to get home.

Susie Vanaman lives just a few yards from the Northampton Road entrance, and says the old passes don’t always work that way.

Three groups are pitching themselves to Massillon city officials for a chance to take over Affinity Medical Center, which closed earlier this year.

City officials are not saying who the groups are or whether they’re based in Stark County, but each one is proposing a health care-related use for the property.

The University of Akron’s decision to cut 80 degree programs is being met with disappointment from faculty – not just because of which programs will be terminated, but also due to new investments into a program for online gamers.

Several Akron churches hosted a rally against violence over the weekend, and their pastors say it’s just the first step toward engaging people in their West Akron neighborhoods.

Akron’s second annual Pride Festival takes place this Saturday, and organizers are dealing with a number of challenges connected with the rapidly growing event.

Organizers of this year’s Pride Festival have had to start turning away vendors due to limited space in Hardesty Park. The steering committee is also expecting protestors – something that didn’t happen last year. A flyer has been circulating online asking for “Prayer Warriors” to surround the park.

MetroHealth System announced plans to expand beyond Cuyahoga County following a change in state law passed earlier this year.

The state legislature in June passed a bill that mainly concerned physician licenses and how nurses can order mental health evaluations.

The 5th Annual Crooked River Commute took place over the weekend as a group kayaked from Kent to Cleveland on the Cuyahoga River and noted how the landscape has changed over the past five years.

Kabir Bhatia / WKSU

The Innerbelt National Forest is now temporarily open to the public, bringing new green space to downtown Akron.

The Akron Art Museum has a new employee: she never eats, she never sleeps, and she’s ready to give tours to every single person who walks into the building.

The new digital tour guide, Dot, lives within the Facebook Messenger app. The goal is to provide information on the museum’s collection and also stimulate conversation among visitors.

Virginique Whitmore, an Akron Public Schools high school teacher, was at the launch party for Dot. She says the app has a major advantage when it comes to reaching her students.

Tomorrow’s special election includes several school levies around the state – including three in Northeast Ohio.

The Innerbelt National Forest is now open to the public, bringing new green space to downtown Akron.

Adirondack chairs, potted trees and an amphitheater are now nestled into a spot adjacent to the Innerbelt, a now-closed highway. The forest was funded by more than $214,000 from the Knight Foundation. One of the volunteers who helped plant trees was Patricia Mosley from Fairlawn, who says she hopes the city is receptive to expanding the project.

The University of Akron’s law school put on a training for attorneys Wednesday who may be interested in pro bono work navigating the complex web of deportation hearings.

Organizers of the training said attorneys want to learn more about immigration law given the large-scale raids that have happened in Northeast Ohio this year.

The city of Akron is evaluating the future of its department in charge of the city’s rec centers and is asking the public for feedback on what it would like to see in its 11 facilities.

It’s been an eventful summer for Cleveland’s 25-year, $3 billion sewer project, as the city opened its first overflow tunnel and begins work on a new extension.

Project Clean Lake” started in 2011 to construct seven tunnels under the city that would hold sewage until it can be treated, instead of going directly into Lake Erie.  The goal is to cut the untreated sewage flowing into the lake from 4.5 billion gallons to a 500,000 gallons.

Kabir Bhatia / WKSU

Monday is the first day of school for about 240 Akron students who are attending the “I Promise School,” an experimental public school backed by Akron native LeBron James.

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