Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

Ohio lawmakers are pushing a bill they think will reduce opioid overdose deaths by setting prescribing guidelines for doctors and dentists. 

Rep. Janine Boyd (at podium) touted a similar bill in last year's state congressional session that failed to pass.
JO INGLES / Ohio Public Radio

There’s a bill in the legislature that’s meant to provide a way for women who earn less than their male counterparts to report those situations.

There’s a bill in the legislature that’s meant to provide a way for women who earn less than their male counterparts to report those situations.

Supporters and opponents of President Donald Trump protested at the Statehouse this weekend in competing demonstrations.

Parents of children with serious medical conditions are pleading with state leaders to keep funding intact for a program that helps pay for treatment. 

A new bill being considered at the Statehouse would restrict the way police agencies could use drones. The legislation has bipartisan support for different reasons.

This bill is sponsored by unusual bedfellows.

A bill that would ban discrimination in housing or employment based on sexual gender or identity has been introduced in the legislature. And it’s not the first time.

There’s a new bill being considered at the Statehouse that would restrict the way police agencies could use drones. The legislation has bipartisan support for different reasons.

With thousands of kids ending up in foster care because of the opioid crisis, the state is trying a pilot program to help children of addicted parents.

Attorney General Mike DeWine says what’s being called the START program will begin in 12 southern Ohio counties with some of the highest levels of abuse in the state.

With thousands of kids ending up in foster care because of the opioid crisis, the state is trying a new pilot program to help children of addicted parents. 

An audit of a Southern Ohio correctional facility has found eleven directors and employees used conferences as a way to cover self-indulgent expenditures. 

A Republican congressman from northeast Ohio is the second to officially file paperwork to run for Governor in 2018. And he seems to be channeling a Trump-like approach.

snow plow
Ohio Department Transporation

Though it’s been cold and snowy this week, this year’s warmer than usual winter is good news for Ohio taxpayers. Before this snowfall, the state had spent a little over $63 million on road salt, when the yearly average spent over the last decade has been nearly $77 million.

Marijuana
File photo

One of the three people who plan to build a medical marijuana campus in Southwest Ohio thinks the drug can be used to treat one of the state’s biggest problems – opioid abuse.

One of the three people who plans to build a medical marijuana campus in Southwest Ohio thinks thinks the drug can be used to treat one of the state’s biggest problems – opioid abuse.

Though it’s been cold and snowy this week, this year’s warmer than usual winter is good news for Ohio taxpayers. Before this snowfall, the state had spent a little over $63 million on road salt, when the yearly average spent over the last decade has been nearly $77 million.

Ohio State Highway Patrol cruiser driving
Raymond Clarke / Flickr

The state’s battle against drug addiction takes place in venues ranging from homes to schools to major highways.

Ohio Public Radio Statehouse News Bureau

Two of the people who played a big part in the marijuana legalization plan rejected by Ohio voters in 2015 are planning to take a key role in Ohio’s new medical marijuana program.

A new bill in the Ohio Legislature aims to crack down on food stamp fraud.

Republican Sen. Bill Coley has a message for people who shouldn’t be getting food stamps but are.

A new bill in the Ohio Legislature aims to crack down on food stamp fraud. 

It’s International Women’s Day. There are events taking place throughout the state to mark the occasion.

Betty Sutton
David Sommerstein / North Country Public Radio

Less than a week after the first official Democratic candidate for governor announced his intentions, a second Democrat has announced she’s jumping into the race too.

Less than a week after the first official Democratic candidate for governor announced his intentions, a second Democrat has announced she’s jumping into the race too. 

Adults with documented medical histories of being routinely prescribed Epi-pens for allergic reactions might soon find it’s easier and cheaper to get those products. Here's more on the bill state lawmakers are considering.

A Democratic state lawmaker is taking issue with a newly introduced bill that would change the process for congressional redistricting. 

There’s a new lesson plan from Ohio’s Bureau of Criminal Investigation for fourth-grade teachers throughout the state. It’s designed to help students use critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

Former Governor Bob Taft speaks with reporter Jo Ingles.
KAREN KASLER / Ohio Public Radio

All three of Ohio’s living former governors were at the Statehouse this week for an event for the Capitol Square Foundation, which, among other things, raises money for improvements to the Statehouse.

Ohioans heard a lot from Gov. Ted Strickland when he ran for U.S. Senate last year but former governors Richard Celeste and Bob Taft have kept lower profiles after leaving office.

All three of Ohio’s former living governors were at the Statehouse this week for an event for the Capitol Square Foundation, which, among other things, raises money for improvements to the Statehouse. Ohioans heard a lot from Gov. Ted Strickland when he ran for U.S. Senate last year, but former governors Richard Celeste and Bob Taft have kept lower profiles since leaving office.

Republican Gov. Bob Taft led Ohio from 1999 to 2007. He’s a little wistful about his time in office.

All three of Ohio’s former living governors were at the Statehouse this week for an event for the Capitol Square Foundation, which, among other things, raises money for improvements to the Statehouse. Ohioans heard a lot from Gov. Ted Strickland when he ran for US Senate last year but former governors Richard Celeste and Bob Taft have kept lower profiles after leaving office. 

A new bill in the Ohio Legislature would change the way congressional districts are drawn. The plan is sponsored by Republican Sen. Frank LaRose of Summit County, the same man who sponsored the last congressional redistricting bill, which didn’t get far. But as Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports, LaRose says it’s different this time around.

LaRose says voters want congressional redistricting and his bill gives state lawmakers two ways to pass a redistricting plan.

Pages