Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

The opponents of Issue 2, the Drug Price Relief Act, recently outspent backers of that proposal by a four to one margin. And most of the money in the opposition’s campaign war chest couldn’t be directly traced because it was in an LLC rather than a traditional political action committee. This has raised questions once again about campaign finance reform, something both the Democrat and Republican candidates say is needed. 

Lt. Governor Mary Taylor is one of the most politically-connected people in Ohio, but says she still felt helpless about her sons' addictions.
Andy Chow

Ohio’s Lieutenant Governor - who is running for the Republican nomination for governor next year - is pushing a plan to deal with opioids that some consider unusual, especially given her opposition to Medicaid expansion.

Ohio State's former football coach Jim Tressel is among those who are talking about suicide and what the state is doing to prevent it.

Republican State Representative Marlene Anielski says one Ohioan commits suicide every five hours. She says it’s the leading cause of death for 10- to 14-year-olds, and the second leading cause of death for 15- to 35-year-olds in Ohio. Jim Tressel, now the president of Youngstown State University, says college students who need help can find it on campuses statewide.

Ohio’s Lieutenant Governor, who is running for the Republican nomination for governor next year, is pushing a plan to deal with opioids that some consider unusual, especially given her opposition to Medicaid expansion.

O'Neill Ouster Condundrum

Nov 10, 2017

Some political analysts think one Republican lawmaker’s plan to remove the only Democratic Justice on the Ohio Supreme Court could backfire. 

Marlene Anielski / Facebook

Ohio State's former football coach Jim Tressel is among those who are talking about suicide and what the state is doing to prevent it. 

Preventing Suicide

Nov 9, 2017

Ohio State's former football coach Jim Tressel is among those who are talking about suicide and what the state is doing to prevent it. 

Vote Here sign
Steven Depolo / flickr

Both Republicans and Democrats are saying Tuesday’s vote gives them reasons to be hopeful about next year’s statewide election, which includes the race for governor.

Both Republicans and Democrats are saying Tuesday’s vote gives them reasons to be hopeful about next year’s 2018 statewide election, which includes the race for governor. 

Issue 1, the constitutional amendment that gives crime victims legal standing, was overwhelming approved by Ohio voters at the ballot box. It passed 83-17.

A surprising win, even for supporters

Dr. Henry Nicholas financed most of the Ohio campaign to pass Issue 1, known as Marsy’s Law. It’s named for his sister, who was killed by her boyfriend in 1983. Nicholas flew in from California to be with supporters of Marsy’s Law as the results came in on Election Night. And he seemed surprised at its overwhelming passage.

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