Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

The 70 mile per hour speed limit that state law now allows on some roads might not be a good idea after all, according to stats from a recent crash report by State Highway Patrol researchers.

Bill O'Neill
Bill O'Neill

Ohio Supreme Court Justice Bill O’Neill offered a bit too much information in a Facebook post on Friday, leading to calls for resignation from both Democrats and Republicans. But O’Neill said he wasn’t hacked and is standing by his comments.

A Facebook post from the only Democratic justice on the Ohio Supreme Court is raising eyebrows today. But in an interview, Ohio Supreme Court Justice Bill O’Neill, the only Democrat holding statewide elected office, says he stands by it.

Ohio Senate

Two Republican state lawmakers and a Democratic Senate staffer have resigned in the last month – all over what’s been termed “inappropriate behavior.”

Though the allegations have ranged in severity, the trend highlights a male-dominated culture at the Statehouse that many legislators and staffers say attracts or encourages harassment and abuse, and which makes women uncomfortable or afraid. 

Two Republican state lawmakers and a Democratic Senate staffer have resigned in the last month – all over what’s been termed “inappropriate behavior”. This raises the question of whether there is a culture at the Statehouse that somehow attracts or encourages behavior that makes people feel uncomfortable or afraid. 

Wikimedia

The already-large field of candidates running for Ohio governor next year could soon grow even more. Former Ohio attorney general and Grove City native Richard Cordray said on Wednesday that he's leaving the top post at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray is announcing he’ll step down from that post before the end of the month. That’s thought by many to signal that he’s running for Governor.

Members of the group, "Moms Demand Action For Gun Sense In America" gathered at the Statehouse.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

As America grappled with another mass shooting on Tuesday, Ohio lawmakers debated the latest bill to expand gun owner rights. The usual arguments were made by both sides, but there was talk of possibly finding middle ground on the issue in the wake of comments by Ohio Gov. John Kasich.

Today’s shootings at multiple locations in Northern California, including an elementary school, are prompting more conversations about gun control. The debate happens daily in nearly every part of the country and today, it was front and center as a gun bill was debated at the Statehouse. But can common ground be found? 

Republican Sen. Frank LaRose (left) and democratic Rep. Kathleen Clyde (right) agree that more transparency is needed in campaign finance.
Jo Ingles/Ohio Public Radio / OHIO HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

The opponents of Issue 2, the Drug Price Relief Act, recently outspent backers of that proposal by a four-to-one margin. And most of the money in the opposition’s campaign war chest couldn’t be directly traced because it was in an LLC rather than a traditional political action committee.

Pages