Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

opioids and prescription medicine bottle
Flickr

There is one statewide issue on the ballot in this November’s election. Issue 1 proposes to reduce prison overcrowding in Ohio by reducing the sentences of non-violent, low-level drug offenders. Opponents argue, among other things, that it would make it harder to prosecute drug traffickers and take away power from judges to sentence or seek rehab where appropriate.

The state budget office is saying that if Issue 1 passes this fall, it will cost local communities more money for a variety of reasons. That’s a main reason why the issue, which is intended to divert money from incarceration into treatment in many cases, has drawn opposition from groups representing cities and counties. 

Carmen Fultz, an employee of Buckeye Relief LLC, sorts the male and female marijuana plants inside a Veg Room, in Eastlake, Ohio.
David Dermer / Associated Press

Several large and small cultivators of marijuana for Ohio’s Medical Marijuana Program say they plan to be harvesting their products soon. But that doesn’t mean patients will be able to buy it anytime soon.

Several large and small cultivators of marijuana for Ohio’s Medical Marijuana Program say they plan to be harvesting their products soon. But that doesn’t mean patients will be able to buy it anytime soon.

Franklin County Board of Elections director David Payne talks to a voter on Saturday, the day after the county set an all-time in-person early voting record of more than 6,800 voters.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Voting rights groups scurried throughout Ohio to meet the deadline for voter registration, and one reached out to possible voters in unusual ways.

Chronic pain patients speak out against new rules for prescribing opioids Chronic pain patients at Ohio Statehouse.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Last year, Ohio changed its rules for prescribing opioids, restricting amounts of, and circumstances under which, doctors can prescribe those narcotics. The new rules have an exemption for people who are in hospice type care for diseases like cancer. 

Groups that are registering voters to cast ballots in November are scurrying throughout Ohio on this final day to register for the 2018 election. One of those groups has been reaching out to possible voters in unusual ways.

Last year, Ohio changed its rules for prescribing opioids, restricting amounts of, and circumstances under which, doctors can prescribe those narcotics. The new rules have an exemption for people who are in hospice type care for diseases like cancer. But many patients who suffer from chronic pain say the new rules are leaving them without pain relief, resulting in unintended consequences.

John Minchillo / Associated Press

Voter registrations are up in Ohio since the November 2016. As of September 8, 2018, there were 7,990,902 voters registered, compared to just over 7,861,000 in the 2016 election.

Voter registrations are up in Ohio since November 2016. And that pleases a non-partisan group that encourages increased voter participation. 

Voter registrations are up in Ohio since November 2016. And that pleases a non-partisan group that encourages increased voter participation. 

The controversy over conservative federal judge Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation to a lifetime position on the U.S. Supreme Court has left many people wondering how the perceived shift in that bench will affect them. LGBTQ Ohioans are concerned.

Backers of gender equality legislation that’s been proposed again in Ohio say they are making slow headway in getting the civil rights protection they think the bill would afford them. 

Rep. Nickie Antonio, a Democrat from Lakewood, discusses the latest push for her bill the Ohio Fairness Act, which extends protections against house and employment discrimination to LGBTQ people.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

The Human Rights Campaign estimates there are 1.8 million LGBTQ Ohioans and their allies. There’s an effort to get those voters to the polls next month, with key statewide races and Ohio’s Congressional delegation on the ballot.

The Human Rights Campaign estimates there are 1.8 million LGBTQ Ohioans and their allies. And there’s an effort to get those voters to the polls next month, with key statewide races and Ohio’s Congressional delegation on the ballot.

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