Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

Ohio Right To Life

Candidates for political office in Ohio who want to be endorsed by the state’s largest organization opposing abortion will have to meet new criteria.

Candidates for political office in Ohio who want to be endorsed by the state’s largest organization opposing abortion will have to meet new criteria.

Candidates who oppose abortion but think it should be allowed in cases of rape or incest will no longer be eligible for Ohio Right to Life’s endorsement. This litmus test, according to the organization’s Katie Franklin, will streamline candidate’s positions with anti-abortion legislation being passed in Ohio.

Candidates for political office in Ohio who want to be endorsed by the state’s largest organization opposing abortion will have to meet new criteria. 

Petitions that were delivered to Governor Kasich

After a three-year break, Ohio is set to execute a death row inmate later this month. Ronald Phillips was convicted of raping and killing his girlfriend’s three-year-old daughter in Akron in 1993. He's scheduled for execution July 26, but opponents of the death penalty continue pressing Governor John Kasich for a last-minute reprieve.

After a three-year break, Ohio is set to execute a death row inmate later this month. Ronald Phillips was convicted of raping and killing his girlfriend’s three-year-old daughter in Akron in 1993. He’s scheduled to receive a lethal injection on July 26th now that courts have given the state’s execution method a green light. Now, death penalty opponents are making a last minute appeal to Gov. John Kasich to spare Phillips and others.

Rob Portman
Gage Skidmore / Flickr Creative Commons

Both of Ohio’s U.S. Senators say they still think it’s possible for lawmakers in Washington to come up with a plan to fix problems with the Affordable Health Care Act.

Both of Ohio’s U.S. Senators say they still think it’s possible for lawmakers in Washington to come up with a plan to fix problems with the Affordable Health Care Act. U.S. Senator Rob Portman says he’s concerned there are not enough insurers available. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports.

Exterior of the Washington Court House auditorium
Dan Konik / Ohio Public Radio

School districts who are building new schools with state money are sometimes surprised by one of the rules. Those dollars cannot be used for something that is in many of the older buildings being replaced — auditoriums.

That creates some tough decisions for school districts as they decide how to move forward with their building plans. 

Backers of "Marsy's Law" at Ohio Statehouse.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Ohioans will be voting on an issue this fall that, if passed, would add what backers call a victim’s bill of rights to the Ohio Constitution.

The Secretary of State has certified signatures submitted by backers of what’s known as “Marsy’s Law,” meaning it’ll be on this fall’s ballot.

The newest version of the U.S. Senate’s plan to overhaul the Affordable Care Act is creating a rift between the vice president and Gov. John Kasich. The state’s Republican senator may be caught in the middle.

The newest version of the U.S. Senate’s plan to reform the Affordable Care Act is out, and it’s creating a rift between the Vice President and Gov. John Kasich. And the state’s Republican Senator may be caught in the middle.

Ohioans will be voting on an issue this fall that, if passed, would add what backers call a victim’s bill of rights to the Ohio constitution. 

Wikipedia Commons

Ohio’s largest group representing abortion opponents is cheering news that two clinics that offered abortions in the Buckeye State have closed their doors. 

Ohio’s largest group representing abortion opponents is cheering news that two clinics that offered abortions in the Buckeye State have closed their doors.  

The Auditorium Conundrum

Jul 14, 2017

(A more comprehensive version of this story is also on this week's "The State of Ohio" show on Ohio Public Television. You can find that story by looking under the State of Ohio tab at the top of the homepage.)

School districts who are building new schools with state money are sometimes surprised by one of the rules. Those dollars cannot be used for something that is in many of the older buildings being replaced….auditoriums. That creates some tough decisions for school districts as they decide how to move forward with their building plans. Take a look at how some districts are doing it.

Ideastream

As Senators in Washington continue to grapple with how to reform the Affordable Care Act, Ohio’s two members explain why they have not embraced plans that have been introduced so far - and what needs to be done to win their support.

The participants protested the planned execution of Ronald Phillips on July 26.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio is set to execute an Akron man inmate later this month. If it happens, it will be the first execution in the state in three-and-a half years. And death penalty opponents are trying to stop it.

Ohio is set to execute an Akron man inmate later this month. If it happens, it will be the first execution in the state in 3 1/2 years. And death penalty opponents are trying to stop it.

Retired United Church of Christ pastor, the Rev. Lynda Smith, is one of about a dozen people who stood outside the building where Gov. John Kasich’s office is located, holding signs and sending a message to him to stop executions in Ohio.

Ohio is set to execute a death row inmate later this month. If it happens, it will be the first execution in the state in three and a half years. Death penalty opponents are trying to stop it.

The Ohio House of Representatives overrode 11 of the 47 vetoes Gov. John Kasich made recently to the state’s proposed budget. But the House didn’t override the most controversial one.

Ohio House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Republican leaders in the Ohio House have a session scheduled for tomorrow morning. But there’s no word yet on whether lawmakers will try to override Gov. John Kasich’s line item vetoes in the state budget.

Representatives in the Ohio House have a session scheduled for tomorrow morning. They will take up a bill that would make changes to rules for constructing new schools and a bill to change gun laws. But there’s no word yet on whether lawmakers will try to override Gov. John Kasich’s line item vetoes in the state budget.

Ohio House chamber
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

The 4th of July celebrations have wrapped up throughout the state, but Ohio lawmakers are unlikely to truly be taking a break. That's because Gov. John Kasich vetoed 47 items when he signed Ohio's two-year budget Friday. 

The 4th of July celebrations are taking place throughout the state, but Ohio lawmakers are unlikely to truly be taking a break. That's because Gov. John Kasich vetoed 47 items when he signed Ohio's two-year budget Friday. One of those is the controversial plan to freeze Medicaid expansion in Ohio in July of next year.

Some former state lawmakers know what it’s like to take their work home with them.

Fourth of July celebrations are taking place throughout the state but Ohio lawmakers are likely not finding this summer holiday to be carefree. That's because Gov. John Kasich vetoed 47 items when he signed the budget Friday. One of those is the controversial plan to freeze the Medicaid expansion program in Ohio in July of next year. Some former state lawmakers say they know what it’s like to walk a mile in the shoes of legislators who can’t get work off their minds.

Gov. John Kasich used his pen to veto 47 items in the new state budget. Among those vetoes was a plan to freeze expansion of Medicaid in 2018. 

The vice chairman of President Trump’s Commission on Election Integrity has sent a letter to all 50 states, asking for registered voters’ names, birthdays, political affiliations, voting history and last four digits of social security numbers. Here is how Ohio’s Secretary of State is handling this.

Dan Konik

Along with the overall $65 billion budget, this week the state legislature also passed a $581 million budget for the Bureau of Workers' Compensation.

Along with the overall $65 million budget, this week the state legislature also passed a $581 million budget for the Bureau of Workers' Compensation. 


Supporters wearing fetus shirts seated in front, women dressed like handmaids in back.
Jo Ingles

The Ohio Senate passed a controversial bill that bans the abortion method most often used after 12 weeks of pregnancy.

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