Jess Mador

Jess Mador comes to WYSO from Knoxville NPR-station WUOT, where she created an interactive multimedia health storytelling project called TruckBeat, one of 15 projects around the country participating in AIR's Localore: #Finding America initiative. Before TruckBeat, Jess was an independent public radio journalist based in Minneapolis. She’s also worked as a staff reporter and producer at Minnesota Public Radio in the Twin Cities, and produced audio, video and web stories for a variety of other news outlets, including NPR News, APM, and PBS television stations. She has a Master's degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York. She loves making documentaries and telling stories at the intersection of journalism, digital and social media.

Republican legislation to dismantle the Affordable Care Act is on its way to the Senate.

The Wright State University board of trustees finance committee Friday announced details of a long-awaited budget proposal. The 2018 budget calls for eliminating 71 employees -- fewer than many feared -- and more than 100 additional vacant positions.

More than half the job cuts would come from administrative positions.

Approximately two dozen are hourly positions, and more than 40 are salaried staff. Four positions would be faculty members. Officials say another 14 current full-time employees will see their hours reduced.  

Crowds are expected in downtown Dayton Friday evening for a rally against repeal of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. Organizers say the protest is needed as the United States Senate prepares to take up legislation that would roll back key provisions of the federal health law.

The GOP-backed American Health Care Act, recently passed by the House, calls for cutting Medicaid funding and allowing states to seek waivers opting them out of some patient protections. 

The United States Senate will soon take up for consideration the GOP House bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

Under the American Health Care Act, states could seek waivers opting them out of some patient protections. The waivers would allow insurance companies to consider health status when deciding the cost of premiums -- and some patients could see premiums rise.  

Montgomery County residents could soon have a chance to voice concerns about the Stony Hollow Landfill, south of Dayton. The state EPA has ordered landfill owners Waste Management to hold a public meeting to hear community complaints. The order also calls on the company to take more than a dozen corrective actions and pay $16,000 in fines.

Ohio EPA spokesperson Dina Pierce says the agency has received more than 150 complaints over the last year.

Healthcare Costs / Flickr Creative Commons

Ohio health care advocates are reacting to Thursday's passage of a GOP health bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. The bill is far from becoming reality. But, if passed into law, the “American Health Care Act” would make a long list of changes to the country’s health-care system.

Ohio health-care advocates are reacting to Thursday's passage of a GOP health bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. The bill is far from becoming reality. But, if passed into law, the “American Health Care Act” would make a long list of changes to the country’s health-care system.  

The village council voted this week to release Yellow Springs police officer Randall K. Hawley from employment. The negotiated separation takes effect May 4.

Hawley was the officer in charge during an altercation in the village at the annual New Year's Eve ball-drop celebrations.

An investigation into the incident found police acted inappropriately when they aimed stun guns at partygoers.

Officials with Dayton’s largest health system and insurance giant UnitedHealthcare say they remain open to talking, despite contract negotiations breaking down.

If the two sides fail to reach an agreement soon, an estimated 60,000 Premier Health patients may need to find new doctors.

The deadline for reaching a deal is May 14. After that, many people with employer-based and Medicaid plans will have to pay out-of-network for Premier hospitals and physicians.

Dear Mr. President asks what you want to say about your community. Today, we’ll hear letters about immigration, a topic that’s generated a lot of controversy since President Donald Trump took office.

Earlier this year, WYSO producers went to 10 Miami Valley libraries to record people’s letters to the president. Many of our writers talked about the Trump administration’s actions on refugees and immigrants.

Despite cool temperatures around 900 people gathered in Dayton’s Courthouse Square Saturday for a rally in support of science. The Earth Day March for Science was one of 15 across Ohio timed to coincide with more than 600 marches nationwide, including on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., and around the world.

Clark County health officials say the number of drug-overdose cases continues to skyrocket. If trends continue, the county could soon surpass the number of drug deaths seen in the county all of last year.

Over the course of just two days, doctors at Springfield Regional Medical Center treated more than four dozen overdose victims, more than double the typical average, health officials say.

But it’s a fraction of Clark County’s total overdoses so far this year. Dozens more have died or were revived by first responders.

Republican 8th district Congressman Warren Davidson is expected to attend a town hall meeting Tuesday in Enon. It will be Davidson’s second such town hall event in as many weeks as Congress continues its spring recess.

The town hall, scheduled for 6 p.m. at the Enon VFW, is being organized by Miami Valley anti-Trump coalition Indivisible.

Some members of that group walked out of Davidson’s last town hall meeting in Troy, saying the format did not allow constituents to have their voices heard.

Since December, WYSO has been collecting your audio letters for a project we’re calling Dear Mr. President, which asks what you want to say about your community – and what you want President Donald Trump to know about the Miami Valley. 

Death-certificate data analyzed by Montgomery County epidemiologists show African Americans experience significantly higher rates of infant mortality than whites, regardless of income and education levels.

The public is invited to learn more about the risk factors for infant mortality Wednesday at a free community health forum, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., on the Central State University Dayton Campus. 

A raucous mix of more than 200 Trump supporters and opponents crowded into a town hall meeting with Republican 8th district Congressman Warren Davidson Tuesday night in Troy. The event was hosted by Tea Party organization Miami County Liberty.

Davidson is a member of the conservative and libertarian House Freedom Caucus and was elected to fill the seat of Former House Speaker John Boehner last year.

The event was one of many similar town halls planned around the country Tuesday as Congress begins a two-week recess this week.

The University of Dayton Tuesday inaugurated Eric F. Spina as its 19th president. The Buffalo, N.Y., native is only the second lay leader in the school's 167-year history. Spina is a mechanical and aerospace engineer who previously served as vice chancellor and provost at Syracuse University.

In a special ceremony at UD Arena, President Eric F. Spina called on the school to help "shape a more just future" by preparing all students to advance the common good.

Southwest Ohioans now have a new way to access routine and urgent-care medical services. Premier Health officials Monday announced a new “virtual clinic” that connects doctors and patients via video conference. 

The Premier Virtual Care program is the first of its kind in the Miami Valley, officials say. The telemedicine program makes doctors available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

It’s intended for patients with non-life threatening conditions such as colds, flu, allergies and back pain, and it works like this:

Dear Mr. President Library Day

On President's Day, WYSO producers went to 10 Miami Valley libraries to record people’s letters to the president.

Stay tuned! 

We'll be sharing some of the letters we recorded during our Dear Mr. President Library Day event this spring, on-air and online.  

How to participate:

Dear Mr. President asks what you want to say about your community, and what you want President Donald Trump to know about the Miami Valley. Submit your own letter by emailing it to wyso@wyso.org.

Dear Mr. President,

"Medical care should be available for every American, not just the wealthy."

Dan Duffy, Yellow Springs.

February 18, 2017

Dear Mr. President asks what you want to say about your community, and what you want President Donald Trump to know about the Miami Valley. Submit your own letter by emailing it to wyso@wyso.org.

More than a dozen elderly homeowners in Dayton’s Westwood neighborhood have been selected by the nonprofit Rebuilding Together Dayton to receive home repairs for free. The event in west Dayton, Saturday April 29, is part of a nationwide annual event made possible by about 100,000 volunteers across the country. 

Rebuilding Together Dayton’s Amy Radachi says the goal of the repair program is to help elderly homeowners remain independent, and avoid moving to expensive assisted-living facilities. She says many of the homeowners chosen for repairs are longtime, stable residents.

Here's a look at the Levitt Pavilion's proposed design, released Tuesday by the nonprofit Friends of Levitt Pavilion Dayton group. The pavilion and free music venue is planned for Dave Hall Plaza in downtown Dayton. Construction is expected to begin later this summer, with an opening in the summer of 2018. 

For the last few months WYSO has been collecting your audio letters for our Dear Mr. President project.

Dear Mr. President asks what you want to say about your community, and what you want President Donald Trump to know about the Miami Valley.  We’ve sorted through dozens of letters so far, and found the number-one topic on the minds of many of our letter writers is an issue that’s dominated headlines this year: health care and what to do about the Affordable Care Act. 

Some Miami Valley colleges and universities are reporting a significant drop in international-student applications this year. The decline is part of a trend reflected in a recent Institute of International Education survey, which found nearly 40 percent of schools across the United States are experiencing similar declines.  

As lawmakers in Washington prepare to vote on a Republican-backed bill to dismantle and replace the Affordable Care Act, more than 60 Affordable Care Act supporters protested Thursday in Moraine outside the Mandalay Banquet Center. It was the second Dayton-area health care protest in a week.

Advocates from anti-hunger groups say President Donald Trump’s $1.15 trillion budget proposal would hurt the neediest Ohioans most. The president’s budget would boost spending for the Pentagon and make a down payment on a United States-Mexico border wall, while cutting funds for many domestic programs, including anti-poverty programs that help needy families across the Miami Valley.

A new analysis of downtown Dayton’s real estate market finds significant pent-up demand for downtown housing. If current trends continue, economic development advocates say, downtown Dayton is on track to see a doubling in the number of new apartments and condos over the next few years.

According to the group's analysis, downtown Dayton’s housing market is currently under-built.

News this week of sweeping Trump administration changes to United States immigration-enforcement policies is sparking a wave of fear among both legal immigrants and immigrants in the Miami Valley illegally, advocates say. The immigration crackdown means millions of people living in the country illegally could face deportation.

We’ve heard a lot since President Donald Trump took office about how divided many people across the country are feeling. What about the mood closer to home?

Clark County development planners are working on a new coordinated economic-growth strategy they say will help attract business development and create more jobs for new and existing county residents.

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