Jess Mador

Jess Mador comes to WYSO from Knoxville NPR-station WUOT, where she created an interactive multimedia health storytelling project called TruckBeat, one of 15 projects around the country participating in AIR's Localore: #Finding America initiative. Before TruckBeat, Jess was an independent public radio journalist based in Minneapolis. She’s also worked as a staff reporter and producer at Minnesota Public Radio in the Twin Cities, and produced audio, video and web stories for a variety of other news outlets, including NPR News, APM, and PBS television stations. She has a Master's degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York. She loves making documentaries and telling stories at the intersection of journalism, digital and social media.

Dozens of family members, advocates, recovering addicts and others affected by opioids shared their stories and experiences Sunday afternoon at a special community meeting held at the downtown branch of the Dayton Public Library.

The event was part of a unique project WYSO is participating in called Your Voice Ohio. The goal of the collaborative initiative is to bring Ohioans from all walks of life together, to brainstorm homegrown solutions to the opioid crisis.

Representatives from a broad range of business, government and military organizations gathered downtown Wednesday afternoon for the Dayton Development Coalition's annual meeting. 

Around 800 people attended the event, which was held at the Benjamin and Marian Schuster Performing Arts Center.

At the meeting, economic development officials touted what they say are signs of economic growth and continued economic recovery. A coalition survey finds the region attracted almost $1 billion in capital investment in 2017.

There is growing evidence that opioids quickly change the brain, making it more likely for users to get hooked and struggle to recover. 

This spring, researchers at the University of Dayton Research Institute will experiment with a new program designed to help opioid addicts retrain their brains, breaking the addiction cycle with neurofeedback therapy.

Keep your eyes on the sky early Wednesday morning for a rare celestial event. If the skies are clear, people in the Miami Valley be able to see a so-called “super blue blood moon.”

It’s the first time this type of moon has been visible in more than three decades.

Learn more about the moon at NPR News.

Joe Childers is an astronomy educator with the Boonshoft Museum of Discovery’s astronomy wing and planetarium.

On Christmas morning Tyra Patterson left a Cleveland prison after serving 23 years of a life sentence.

Jess Mador / WYSO

State health officials are promoting visiting nurse programs as part of a statewide strategy to reduce Ohio’s infant mortality rate. It’s persistently higher than the national rate, despite recent progress in reducing the number of sleep-related infant deaths.

State health officials are promoting visiting nurse programs as part of a statewide strategy to reduce Ohio’s infant mortality rate.

 

One thousand people are getting killed in southwest Ohio yearly.

By what?

Opioids. Drugs.

As journalists, we’re troubled that our aggressive coverage of the escalating death toll and costly side effects of opioids have been without a widespread public mobilization. We like to think we’re providing information that helps the community identify and solve problems, but this one eludes us.

That’s an admission on our part: We care about our communities. We believe 1,000 dead people every year cries out for understanding – and game-changing action.

Dayton officials are seeking public comments on a plan to close or consolidate Dayton Public School-district facilities.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, members of the Dayton City Commission and DPS officials Thursday launched a new 16-member task force that will work to identify underutilized administration buildings and schools for potential shutdown after the current school year.

UnitedHealthcare and Premier Health have reached a contract agreement. The deal restores in-network access to Premier doctors and facilities for nearly 200,000 UnitedHealthcare policyholders.

Last spring, contract talks between Dayton-based Premier and Minnesota-based insurance giant UnitedHealth Group broke down. The impasse left at least 60,000 Premier Health patients out of network with their doctors.

A temporary special discounted flat fee offered by Premier last year to help patients maintain their medical care expired December 31, 2017.

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