Jerry Kenney

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

We Care Arts in Kettering gives individuals with disabilities the opportunity to create, market and sell their own works of art. The mission is one that Executive Director Darlene Langhout was aware of before she came to lead the non-profit.

“I had experience with We Care Arts through a grief program. My husband passed away in 2013 and my daughter and I were able to work through that program, it was a ten-week program and have some therapeutic art in order to put us in a better place, and so having experienced it, I truly believe the ability for it to work for all individuals not just our primary client base,” she said.

Attorneys representing the West Dayton Clergy Community Coalition group announced Monday the United States Department of Health and Human Services has opened an investigation into the planned closure of Good Samaritan Hospital. Attorney Ellis Jacobs with Able Law says the agency has also asked to meet with Premier Health Partnership officials within the next five days.

A recent WYSO investigation revealed thousands of kindergarten through third grade students are suspended each year.

The Victoria Theatre Association has a new president and CEO. The Victoria Theatre board of trustees announced Ty Sutton will replace retiring president and CEO Ken Neufeld.

Ty Sutton comes to the Victoria after three years as executive director of the Butler Arts Center at Butler University.

Victoria officials cite Sutton’s “20 years of arts venue management experience”  and his extensive fundraising, marketing and programming knowledge as factors in his selection.

A new WYSO analysis of state education data show Ohio school officials issued 30,000 suspensions to K-through-third-grade students in the 2016 school year.

There’s an old farming adage when it comes to corn crops: “knee-high by the Fourth of July.” The traditional saying refers to how tall a good corn crop should be by that date. But for many Miami Valley farmers this year, the corn crop passed that benchmark some time ago. 
 

Ty Kalaus, regional deputy director for the United States Department of Agriculture, Great Lakes Region says some of the credit goes to this spring and summer’s alternately rainy -- and then hot, dry weather. 

On Friday, officials in Miami Township in Montgomery County are expected to celebrate the rededication ceremony of a neighborhood park. The park had been closed because of lead and arsenic contamination found at the site.

Layer Park is on Cordell Dr. in what some call the Huber South section of Miami Township.

The park reopens after a $3 million cleanup that began more than two and a half years ago -- after, officials say, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency first discovered toxins at the park.

The 166th Montgomery County Fair opens next month at its new location. The site is virtually double the size of the old fairgrounds, adjacent to Miami Valley Hospital downtown.

A top former official at Wright State University has officially been fired after previously being on paid leave for more than three years. The provost’s termination is related to an ongoing probe into alleged violations of a federal temporary work-visa program.

Officials placed former provost Sundaram Narayanan on paid leave in 2015 after a federal investigation was launched into alleged immigration-law violations. 

Montgomery County has some of the highest rates of infant mortality in the country, and data show the problem is often related to premature birth and low birth weight.

Now, the Dayton Police Department is trying something new as part of a larger countywide effort aimed at bringing infant mortality rates down. Police will be collaborating with an intensive home-visiting program that helps families with newborns and young children.  

In the latest installment of our series Bulletin Board Diaries we follow a lede found on a business card at a cafe ... to Cedarville University. That’s where we meet a man who found a creative way to battle his own depression –– through music.

Dayton History’s Rail Fest returns to Carillon Historical Park June 23, 2018.  The two-day event is billed as a “family fun event featuring free miniature train rides, live steam engines, model train displays, historical displays, train merchandise, and rail vendors,” among its attractions.

Festival co-chair David Oroszia and says railways were important to the development of the Miami Valley and many other cities around the country.

In the age of online advertising, some people still use the old-school method to promote stuff they want to buy and sell –– by posting on bulletin boards in laundromats, restaurants and other establishments. WYSO’s Bulletin Board Diaries brings you some of the stories behind these ads.

Today in the series, we meet 28 year-old, Cedarville resident Andy McFarlane. We found his business card at the Beans-n-Cream coffee shop downtown - listing him as a composer, arranger, and private music instructor.

Officials with Premier Health and the University of Dayton say the planned redevelopment of the former Montgomery County Fairgrounds site may take up to several decades. The two organizations that own the 38 acres of land have issued a joint statement saying it could take, “15 to 20 years to achieve the full vision,” of redevelopment.

Ohio Board of Pharmacy officials Monday announced the approval of 56 medical marijuana dispensary locations across the state. But officials say the medical marijuana from growers won’t be available to the dispensaries and patients until after the expected September deadline.

The state pharmacy board says they received more 376 medical marijuana dispensary applications since 2016 when Governor John Kasich signed into law the state’s medical marijuana program.

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