Jerry Kenney

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Recently, Dayton History opened to the public their latest historical exhibit detailing the history of operations at the Mound Nuclear Facility in Miamisburg. The Cold War Discovery Center highlights the work conducted at Mound Laboratories. By all accounts, it was important work. It was top-secret, and it was dangerous for the workers - many of whom were exposed to radiation and other toxic elements used at the site.

Antioch University is moving ahead with the sale of their Yellow Springs campus. The Yellow Springs News reports the university has marketed the building with a national real-estate firm.

News of the potential sale was first announced in 2016. Officials told WYSO they're looking for a smaller space in a more centrally located area, such as Dayton, nearer to more potential future students.

Incumbents GOP Montgomery County State Rep. Niraj Antani and Democratic House Minority Leader Fred Strahorn sailed to reelection in the May 8 Ohio primary.

In the Ohio House District 42 race, Antani beat Republican challengers Sarah Clark and Marcus Rech, winning ​63 percent of Republican ballots cast.

Antani goes on to face Democrat Zach Dickerson in the November general election.

Dickerson took 56 percent of the Democratic ballots against challenger Wright State University student Autumn Kern.

In Tuesday's Democratic primary for Montgomery County Commissioner, current Montgomery County treasurer Carolyn Rice beat challenger Don Shaffer by a wide margin, with Rice capturing 89 percent of the vote. She’ll go on to face local businessman and Republican Doug Barry in the November general election.

Capturing 41 percent of Republican ballots, Barry narrowly edged out challengers former Dayton Mayor Gary Leitzell and Bob Matthews.

Democrats have held the majority on the Montgomery County Commission for more than a decade.

A coalition of West Dayton religious groups is calling for a federal civil rights investigation into the shutdown of Good Samaritan hospital. Premier Health recently announced it will close the medical center later this year.

On the ballot in Tuesday’s May 8 Primary is a special election for the Dayton City Commission seat formerly held by Joey Williams. Williams announced in February he would step down because of work obligations. 

Williams was reelected to the Dayton City Commission less than four months before his resignation. Now, two well-known faith-based community leaders -- with similar first names -- are competing to join the existing commissioners on the board. 

Niraj Antani / Ohio House

Incumbent Montgomery County state Rep. Niraj Antani will face a league of Republican challengers in the upcoming May 8 primary election. Two Democrats are also vying for the two-term Republican’s seat in the 42nd District. 

Incumbent Montgomery County State Rep. Niraj Antani will face Republican challengers in the upcoming May 8 primary election. Two Democrats are also vying for the two-term Republican State Representative’s District-42 seat.  

The May 8 primary elections are heating up. Among the competitive races is the election for Montgomery County Commissioner. Both the Democratic and Republican candidates face challengers.

More than a hundred years ago, there were two young men at Central High School in downtown Dayton who became lifelong friends. Their lives were both tragically short, but full of consequence.

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