Jerry Kenney

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Officials with Premier Health and the University of Dayton say the planned redevelopment of the former Montgomery County Fairgrounds site may take up to several decades. The two organizations that own the 38 acres of land have issued a joint statement saying it could take, “15 to 20 years to achieve the full vision,” of redevelopment.

Ohio Board of Pharmacy officials Monday announced the approval of 56 medical marijuana dispensary locations across the state. But officials say the medical marijuana from growers won’t be available to the dispensaries and patients until after the expected September deadline.

The state pharmacy board says they received more 376 medical marijuana dispensary applications since 2016 when Governor John Kasich signed into law the state’s medical marijuana program.

A class-action lawsuit alleging Fuyao Glass America failed to pay overtime and give workers adequate breaks is moving forward in the courts. The global Chinese auto glass maker employs more than 2,000 workers at its Moraine plant.

WYSO's Jerry Kenney spoke with Dayton Daily News Investigative Reporter Tom Gnau who says the lawsuit’s outcome could have worldwide implications in the manufacturing industry. The case was filed in Dayton federal court last year.  

A former Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office captain, accused of pepper-spraying a restrained inmate at the Montgomery County Jail in 2015, has pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct. The settlement is part of a plea deal that also bars the officer from rejoining the ranks of law enforcement.

Captain Judith Sealey was a sergeant when she used pepper spray on then-inmate Amber Swink. Swink was reportedly belligerent but fully restrained in a seven-point harness during the incident.

A video of the altercation released last year by Swink’s attorney drew national attention.

On June 1 and 2 in Yellow Springs, Antioch College and the Community Empowerment Organization (CEO) will host their second Restorative Justice Conference on the Antioch Campus. The theme of this year's discussions center around "Are We There Yet? Healing Harms in Sexual and Family Violence and the Role of Restorative Justice."

CEO director, Jalyn Roe, says the conference, just as it did in 2017,  will feature expert speakers who are at the forefront when it comes to applying restorative practices to a host of social issues.

The Dayton City Commission agreed Wednesday morning to approve a $10 million loan to the development group in charge of renovating the Dayton Arcade. Commissioners will grant the loan to Cross Street Partners, Model Group and McCormack Baron Salazar “at the time the developer group closes its financing arrangements.”

City Manager Shelly Dickstein says the move by the city is a necessary one.

2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the The National Wild and Scenic Rivers System Act. The law was created by Congress in 1968 “to preserve certain rivers with outstanding natural, cultural, and recreational values in a free-flowing condition for the enjoyment of present and future generations.”

To commemorate the anniversary, the Little Miami Watershed Network (LMWN) of local organizations are putting some extra effort in raising awareness of the river, its tributaries and their importance to the Miami Valley.

Since 2005, when Carillon Historical Park merged with the Montgomery County Historical Society to form Dayton History, the organization has been in high-gear uncovering and promoting Dayton’s past.

An assortment of WWII-era planes took to the skies above Dayton Wednesday, as the National Museum of the United States Air Force unveiled its latest exhibit. The show includes the restored B-17 bomber called The Memphis Belle. The infamous plane was the first to complete 25 missions over Europe during the Second World War. The plane and its missions were the subject of a documentary, and a feature film.

The renovated B-17 used in the 1990 film the movie, also called Memphis Belle, was part of the early morning flyover above the museum.

The story of Wilbur and Orville Wright has been told countless times. Two completely self-taught, self-funded brothers invent the airplane in the back of their West Dayton bike shop. The world was never the same. But the story of the Wright brothers’ background is even more unorthodox than it seems.

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