Jennifer Hambrick

Classical Midday Announcer

Jennifer Hambrick unites her extensive backgrounds in the arts and media and her deep roots in Columbus to bring inspiring music to central Ohio as Classical 101’s midday host. Jennifer performed with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and the Civic Orchestra of Chicago before earning a Ph.D. in musicology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

She is a graduate of the Eastman School of Music and the recipient of both the Eastman School’s prestigious Performer’s Certificate and a Fulbright grant for advanced study in London, England.

As a writer and radio producer, Jennifer has interviewed some of the world’s most fascinating people, including Nobel Peace Prize-winning authors, Wolfe Prize-winning mathematicians and many of the world’s foremost classical musicians. Her feature writing has appeared in numerous publications across the country, as well as on WOSU Radio and wosu.org, and has garnered national awards. An award-winning poet, Jennifer’s poetry has also been honored with nominations for the Pushcart Prize and the Ohioana Book Award.

Jennifer enjoys seeking out adventures in good food and healthy living, digging deep in her garden and savoring good times with family.

Ways to Connect

Daniel Houck's workshop
Daniel Houck

Central Ohioan Daniel Houck was pushed into the limelight when Strad Style, the indie film chronicling his unlikely rise from a tinkerer who learned violin-making by watching YouTube videos to a craftsman tasked with creating an instrument for a concert violinist, won big at the 2017 Slamdance Film Festival.

With Strad Style as his launchpad, will Houck be able to keep his career aloft on the international classical music scene?

color photo of Lancaster Chorale performing
LancasterChorale Facebook page

There's nothing average about your average symphonic concert — the excitement as the musicians warm up onstage, the anticipation as the principal oboist tunes the other players, the astonishing moment when the conductor steps out and the orchestra unleashes wave after powerful wave of sound.

When LancasterChorale performs its Symphony of Voices concerts this weekend, you’ll experience all of the rich sounds, dazzling textures and powerful emotions of an orchestra concert sung by a full choir of professional singers.

Jolesch Enterprises / cleachmusic.com

What started with the chatter of nonsense syllables and virtuosic pitter-pattering on an exotic hand drum ended with an upside-down snare drum and the otherworldly sounds of a recorded phone call.

Wednesday's preview in the Classical 101 studios of Cameron Leach's solo electroacoustic percussion concert ELISION wasn't just drumming. It was a sight to behold, a sound to take in and an event that only begins to describe what this Saturday's ELISION concert is all about.

Cameron Leach performs ELISION at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 3 at the Columbus Performing Arts Center's Van Fleet Theatre. The concert is supported by the Johnstone Fund for New Music. Admission is free.

color photo of the musicians of Quartet Davis
Quartet Davis Facebook page

Think you know what a string quartet sounds like? Quartet Davis might have you thinking again.

Founded at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music, Quartet Davis blends a classical string quartet sound with influences from jazz, bluegrass, R&B and folk music to create a truly unique musical experience. This creative, young quartet joined me last week in the Classical 101 studios for an intimate interview and performance.

a few lines of shape note music
Bill Smith/Creative Commons/Flickr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/byzantiumbooks/32773311793/in/photolist-34Ydj3-T7rmQE-RW4MMT-58v5mx-eciDGJ

A noted French author once said the accent of one's birthplace persists in the mind and heart as much as in speech.

The same holds true for musical works, and for two musical works, in particular — English composer Ralph Vaughan Williams’ Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis and the American work it inspired, Thomas Canning’s Fantasy on a Hymn Tune.

Longtime Classical 101 afternoon drive-time announcer John Rittmeyer hosts his final broadcast Friday, Dec. 29, before heading into retirement after 30 years at WOSU.

color photo of clear wine glass and multicolored Christmas lights
BluEyedA73 / Flickr

The days are getting shorter, the cold is setting in and the holiday hubbub is descending on us like the Grinch down hillside in his overburdened sled.

But don’t let the darkness get you down. Join me for the Holiday Happy Hour, Christmas Eve at noon and Christmas Day at 10 a.m. on Classical 101.

color photo of the members of Alphorn Grüezie standing with their alphorns in front of the Swiss clock in Sugarcreek, Ohio
Heather Densmore / Alphorn Grüezie Facebook page

Ohio is not a state known for its mountains. The Hocking Hills, the Appalachian foothills and the state’s other areas of rolling terrain, though lush and beautiful, aren’t exactly the Alps.

But that’s not keeping growing numbers of people around the Buckeye State from picking up an instrument deeply tied to Alpine life, the alphorn, as a musical avocation. And it’s also not stopping Ohio’s premiere alphorn ensemble from appearing as the opening act in the 35th-anniversary performances of Merry TubaChristmas Columbus later this month.

color photo of John Rittmeyer taking at the microphone
Jennifer Hambrick

The afternoon announcer with the warm voice and the calm, gentle demeanor — on and off the air — will be signing off from Classical 101 for good at the end of December.

Classical 101 afternoon host John Rittmeyer is retiring after more than 30 years at WOSU. The friendly voice you’ve heard at the end of your workday, during your evening commutes and while you settle into your evening at home has been a steady companion for thousands of listeners through the years.

black-and-white image of people in a standing ovation
Joi Ito / Flickr

“You know, Miss Ruth was a lady," begins the famous line from the period film Fried Green Tomatoes. "And a lady always knows when to leave.”

The same holds true with musical works. How a piece ends — how it leaves the room, so to speak — will linger in your mind and spirit long after all is said and done.

Here are some of my favorite musical farewells, exit lines and parting shots. Some go out in a proverbial blaze of glory; others are strong, silent types. But all of them leave you with that feeling that you’ve just experienced something amazing.

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