Jennifer Hambrick

Classical Midday Announcer

Jennifer Hambrick unites her extensive backgrounds in the arts and media and her deep roots in Columbus to bring inspiring music to central Ohio as Classical 101’s midday host. Jennifer performed with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and the Civic Orchestra of Chicago before earning a Ph.D. in musicology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

She is a graduate of the Eastman School of Music and the recipient of both the Eastman School’s prestigious Performer’s Certificate and a Fulbright grant for advanced study in London, England.

As a writer and radio producer, Jennifer has interviewed some of the world’s most fascinating people, including Nobel Peace Prize-winning authors, Wolfe Prize-winning mathematicians and many of the world’s foremost classical musicians. Her feature writing has appeared in numerous publications across the country, as well as on WOSU Radio and wosu.org, and has garnered national awards. An award-winning poet, Jennifer’s poetry has also been honored with nominations for the Pushcart Prize and the Ohioana Book Award.

Jennifer enjoys seeking out adventures in good food and healthy living, digging deep in her garden and savoring good times with family.

Ways to Connect

color photo of Leonard Bernstein conducting
New York Philharmonic / youtube.com/watch?v=fHPRWEpyxfM

The year is 1941. War is raging in Europe.

Here on the home front, Leonard Bernstein is 23 years old, a student at Philadelphia's Curtis institute of Music and a mentee of two legendary conductors — Fritz Reiner and Serge Koussevitzky.

black-and-white photo of Leonard Bernstein pointing with his foot to notes on an oversized score of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony
CBS / alexanderstreet.com

For more than a decade, Leonard Bernstein brought young people to classical music through his televised Young People's Concerts with the New York Philharmonic. But before that series, Bernstein was a fixture on the major network TV series Omnibus.

black-and-white photo of Leonard Bernstein standing in front of a blackboard with staff lines on it
leonardbernstein.com

There's Leonard Bernstein, the composer of all that splashy, jazzy music for West Side Story. There’s Leonard Bernstein, the showy — some might say flamboyant — conductor of the New York Philharmonic and other top-flight orchestras.

And then there’s Leonard Bernstein, the generous mentor of aspiring conductors who today occupy the prestigious podiums where Bernstein himself once stood.

color photo of William Bolcom sitting in a theater and looking over a musical score
Peter Smith / williambolcom.com

He was pivotal in reviving the American musical genre of ragtime. He has composed music in a range of styles that all but erases the lines between art music and popular music.

And he has taught and mentored some of the foremost composers in America today — including some working right here in Central Ohio.

Columbus is becoming a hotbed of new music activity, and flutist Lindsey Goodman is right in the thick of it.

At 100 years old this year, Upper Arlington is a vibrant community of historic homes, impressive schools and enticing shops and restaurants.

As part of the city's centennial celebration, the Upper Arlington High School Orchestra is performing the world premiere of a new musical work commissioned for the student orchestra, honoring Upper Arlington's past and celebrating its present and envisioned future.

Deutsche Grammophon

History, that capricious dispenser of fate, remembers some people well, others not so well and still others not at all. The same is true for musical works — some of which enjoy immortality, while others languish in obscurity, waiting for heroes to bring them back to light.

Italian violinist Francesca Dego may well go down in history as the heroine of a lesser-known violin concerto by 20th-century composer Ermanno Wolf-Ferrari. It's a gorgeous work she justly calls a "gem" and an "Italian opera for the violin" that fell into neglect as victim to some of history's darker, crueler twists of fate.

color photo of matthew Burtner looking at a large score
matthewburtner.com

Composer and sound artist Matthew Burtner says he understands the sound of snow.

“Growing up in Alaska, the sound of snow is what really got me into computer music,” said Burtner —professor of composition and computer technologies and chair of the McIntire Department of Music at the University of Virginia — in a recent phone interview. “I just understand the sound of snow really well, and I’ve used it in my music for a long time.”

Two poets and a composer walk into a radio studio. Nope, not the setup for a silly joke — but instead for an intriguing conversation among local artists about creating art.

Monday afternoon Columbus composer Jacob Reed and Thomas Worthington High School student poet Nat Hickman joined me in the Classical 101 studios for a conversation about writing poetry and music inspired by poetry.

color photo of LancasterChorale singing in a concert in a church
facebook.com/lancaster-chorale

It happens early on in almost every creation story — the stars and the planets are made and set in motion, leaving us, throughout the eons, to look up at the sky and wonder how it all works.

It is the stuff of poetry and music. And this weekend, LancasterChorale will perform a program of works inspired by celestial bodies and other natural wonders.

Pages