Jennifer Hambrick

Classical Midday Announcer

Jennifer Hambrick unites her extensive backgrounds in the arts and media and her deep roots in Columbus to bring inspiring music to central Ohio as Classical 101’s midday host. Jennifer performed with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and the Civic Orchestra of Chicago before earning a Ph.D. in musicology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

She is a graduate of the Eastman School of Music and the recipient of both the Eastman School’s prestigious Performer’s Certificate and a Fulbright grant for advanced study in London, England.

As a writer and radio producer, Jennifer has interviewed some of the world’s most fascinating people, including Nobel Peace Prize-winning authors, Wolfe Prize-winning mathematicians and many of the world’s foremost classical musicians. Her feature writing has appeared in numerous publications across the country, as well as on WOSU Radio and wosu.org, and has garnered national awards. An award-winning poet, Jennifer’s poetry has also been honored with nominations for the Pushcart Prize and the Ohioana Book Award.

Jennifer enjoys seeking out adventures in good food and healthy living, digging deep in her garden and savoring good times with family.

Ways to Connect

Two poets and a composer walk into a radio studio. Nope, not the setup for a silly joke — but instead for an intriguing conversation among local artists about creating art.

Monday afternoon Columbus composer Jacob Reed and Thomas Worthington High School student poet Nat Hickman joined me in the Classical 101 studios for a conversation about writing poetry and music inspired by poetry.

color photo of LancasterChorale singing in a concert in a church
facebook.com/lancaster-chorale

It happens early on in almost every creation story — the stars and the planets are made and set in motion, leaving us, throughout the eons, to look up at the sky and wonder how it all works.

It is the stuff of poetry and music. And this weekend, LancasterChorale will perform a program of works inspired by celestial bodies and other natural wonders.

color photo of the facade of the Ohio Statehouse
Jim Bowen / Flickr

The alarming escalation of school shootings in recent years has left our nation grieving for innocent lives lost and desperate to bring the bloodshed to an end. A student-led group of Ohio musicians is aiming to help end school shootings — not with political rhetoric, not from the bully pulpit, but instead with a day full of beautiful music.

color photo of composer Caroline Shaw
Kait Moreno / carolineshaw.com

During Women’s History Month, I continue my conversation with one of today’s most acclaimed women composers, Pulitzer Prize-winner Caroline Shaw.

In part 2 of my October 2017 interview with Shaw, we talk about some of the most significant influences — musical and otherwise — on her music, the state of new music today, why music by women composers remains underrepresented on concert programs and how to begin changing that tradition.

color photo of composer Caroline Shaw
Kait Moreno / carolineshaw.com

As the saying goes, everything has a price. Had the entry fee for the 2013 Pulitzer Prize competition in music been more than $50, Caroline Shaw might not have become the youngest person ever to win that coveted award.

color photo of REBEL Baroque musicians holding instruments
Howard Goodman / rebelbaroque.com

Last Friday afternoon, Classical 101 really did go for Baroque.

Our crew went to Capital University’s Mees Auditorium for a rehearsal of acclaimed ensemble REBEL Baroque and two of the world’s foremost Baroque dancers, Paige Whitley-Bauguess and Thomas Baird.

color photo of Maren Montalbano and Melissa Dunphy
melissadunphy.com

A young Norse woman dresses up as a man, sails to the distant island where her ancestors are buried and demands that her dead father hand over a powerful sword as her birthright.

No, it’s not a role-playing game. It’s Philadelphia-based composer Melissa Dunphy’s Hervararkviða​, or The Incantation of Hervor, a set of three songs for mezzo-soprano, violin and harp whose texts tell a story as unusual as the sound-world Dunphy’s score creates for it.

arpeggiata.com

Picture it: George Frideric Händel’s music played like jazz, complete with improv, riffs, sparkling syncopations and blisteringly virtuosic licks.

Sound outrageous? Not really, says Christina Pluhar, founder and director of early music ensemble L’arpeggiata.

black-an-white formal photo of Harriet Neff Murphy
Ronald Murphy

A piece of music written more than 70 years ago by an Ohio composer but only recently brought to light will finally be heard this Saturday and Tuesday evenings on Classical 101, as part of  Women of NoteThe American Sound’s celebration of women composers during Women’s History Month.

Daniel Houck's workshop
Daniel Houck

Central Ohioan Daniel Houck was pushed into the limelight when Strad Style, the indie film chronicling his unlikely rise from a tinkerer who learned violin-making by watching YouTube videos to a craftsman tasked with creating an instrument for a concert violinist, won big at the 2017 Slamdance Film Festival.

With Strad Style as his launchpad, will Houck be able to keep his career aloft on the international classical music scene?

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