Jeff St. Clair

"Meteorites are delivered to us free of charge," says Ralph Harvey, a professor in the department of Earth, environmental, and planetary science at Case Western Reserve University.

"Yes, they’re delivered randomly. Yes we have to go pick them up in weird places, but the value of them as specimens is not diminished," says Harvey.

Cleveland has the highest concentration of small manufacturers in Ohio.

Many of these companies have been making things the same way for generations.

In the first of a two-part Exploradio, we look at the way things have been made, and what companies need to change in order to survive.

We may be on the cusp of another industrial revolution, engineers call it Industry 4.0.

Industry 1.0 was the steam engine.   

Jeff St. Clair / WKSU

A Cleveland manufacturer says the tariffs imposed against imported steel are making it harder to do business in the U.S. It's hoping for a quick resolution of trade disputes with suppliers.

A Cleveland manufacturer says the tariffs imposed against imported steel are making it harder to do business in the U.S. It's hoping for a quick resolution of trade disputes with suppliers.

Dan Collins is VP of sales and marketing at Wire Products Company in Cleveland.

His two west-side plants convert coils of steel wire into latches, springs, hooks, and clips for everything from lawn mowers to jet airplanes.

Collins says, after years of steady pricing, the industry is in upheaval.

Fake news is a term that’s come to define our current political landscape, but it’s nothing new.

Propaganda, lies, and fairy tales have always been part of human discourse.

In this week’s Exploradio, we talk with two researchers looking into the psychology behind believable falsehoods and how to guard against them.

We live in an age where facts are called into question, and the truth is slippery. 

There’s a summer program in Northeast Ohio that offers hands-on experience with the cadavers used by medical students.

The Northeast Ohio Medical University in Rootstown is opening up its anatomy labs to community members who want to learn more about the human body.

The pace of the program is blistering.

A human brain, beige and lumpy, sits on a bright blue tray as second-year medical student Trey Moberly dives into its structures.

A researcher at Case Western Reserve University discovered a new treatment for spinal cord injuries that may allow nerves to regrow and perhaps restore lost movement to paralyzed people.

The breakthrough comes after a three-decade search.

It was once thought that damaged nerve cells could never regrow, but Jerry Silver, who is a distinguished professor in neuroscience, never bought into that.

A team at Case Western Reserve University has come up with a new approach to treating Multiple Sclerosis. They’ve also launched a business to bring the new therapy to market.

The company is called Convelo Therapeutics.

NASA

While nuclear power in Ohio heads into the sunset, NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland has developed a portable nuclear energy system for outer space.

While nuclear power in Ohio is heading into the sunset, NASA Glenn in Cleveland has developed a portable nuclear energy system for outer space.

In this Week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at how the system combines a new nuclear concept with a centuries-old mechanical engine.

At the unveiling of the new Kilopower system, Jim Ryder, NASA’s head of space technology laid out why it’s needed.

Science enthusiasts are planning a March for Science in Cleveland on Saturday.

Organizers say it’s a celebration of science and a call to support the scientific community. Case Western Reserve University biologist Patricia Princehouse is one of the organizers.

She said recent attempts by the federal government to censor, or misrepresent findings concerning climate change, endangered species, and other issues amount to an attack on science.

The U.S. EPA is moving ahead with the next phase of removing the largest remaining dam on the Cuyahoga River. Federal, state, and local agencies are paving the way for the most complicated part of the process.

The massive dam – part of a former hydroelectric generator – holds 832,000 cubic feet of contaminated sediment behind it.

And all that muck need to be moved before the concrete dam comes down.

A wetland along western Lake Erie’s shore is home to one of the world’s best spots for bird-watching. It’s also a hotspot for bird research.

This week’s Exploradio looks at the science and passion surrounding Ohio’s major migration stopover.

Even after decades of birdwatching all over the world, author and naturalist Kenn Kaufman still gets a kick out of spotting a tiny songbird close to home.

Eight Nobel laureates are among the scientific luminaries gathering in Cleveland this weekend to celebrate the 50th anniversary of one of the most important theories in science.

The Standard Model of particle physics was proposed in the late 1960’s.

Ohio is increasingly viewed as a business friendly state, according to the latest survey by Chief Executive Magazine. The improved rankings may be a sign that Ohio has finally shed its rust-belt reputation.
 

This year’s survey of CEOs across the country ranks Ohio’s business climate in the top 10 for the second time since 2016.

Business leaders gave the Buckeye State above average marks in the three categories of taxation and regulation, workforce quality, and favorable living environment.

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