Howard Wilkinson

Howard Wilkinson joined the WVXU News Team after 30 years of covering local and state politics for The Cincinnati Enquirer. A native of Dayton, Ohio, Wilkinson has covered every Ohio governor’s race since 1974 as well as 12 presidential nominating conventions. His streak continued by covering both the 2012 Republican and Democratic conventions for 91.7 WVXU. Along with politics, Wilkinson also covered the 2001 Cincinnati race riots; the Lucasville Prison riot in 1993; the Air Canada plane crash at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport in 1983; and the 1997 Ohio River flooding. The Cincinnati Reds are his passion. "I've been listening to WVXU and public radio for many years, and I couldn't be more pleased at the opportunity to be part of it,” he says.

In 2012, the Society of Professional Journalists inducted Wilkinson into the Cincinnati Journalism Hall of Fame. 

Wilkinson appears on  Cincinnati Edition, blogs on politics and more, and writes the weekly column Politically Speaking at wvxu.org.

The two Democrats and two Republicans on the Hamilton County Board of Elections can’t go too long without a tussle; and they had been way too agreeable with each other lately.

That ended last Monday over the name of a candidate for Hamilton County commissioner. That name – actually a candidate’s middle name – set off a row between the Democrats and Republicans on the board.

    

After a long battle with cancer, Reds Hall of Fame pitcher Jim O'Toole passed away Saturday at the age of 78. 

The left-handed starter was a mainstay of the Reds' rotation in the 1960s; and the Chicago native stayed in Cincinnati after his pitching career, where he and his wife raised 11 children. 

In March, WVXU's Howard Wilkinson recorded an appreciation of O'Toole for Around Cincinnati when he was named Grand Marshal of Cincinnati's 2015 St. Patrick's Day parade. You can listen to it here. 

Former Cincinnati Reds pitcher Jim O’Toole has been named Honorary Grand Marshall for Cincinnati’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade. Our Howard Wilkinson talks about Jim O’Toole: the character, competitor and storyteller.

Two-term Republican Greg Hartmann  said Tuesday morning he will officially resign from office on Monday, clearing the way for the Hamilton County Republican Party to name his successor.

That is likely to be Dennis Deters, a Colerain Township trustee. Deters and two other Republicans filed for the office by the Dec. 16  deadline for the March primary. Two have dropped out, leaving only Deters.

Suspended juvenile court judge Tracie Hunter won’t be on the March 15 primary ballot as a Democratic candidate for judge. 

The Hamilton County Board of Elections – two Democrats and two Republicans – voted unanimously Monday morning to bar Hunter from running for the juvenile court seat from which she was suspended. 

  WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about what kind of field of candidates Ohio voters may face when they go to the polls March 15 for the Ohio presidential primary. 

  Ohio’s primary election is March 15; and, in southwest Ohio, there’s every reason to believe that both Democrats and Republicans will have good reasons to go to the polls (or vote early).

Let’s deal with the obvious one first, the one every Republican and Democratic voter in the state can help decide – a little thing we like to call the “presidential primary.”

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talks with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about how the Hamilton County Board of Elections plans to solve the problems with its e-polling system that plagued this year's general election. 

Elections can be messy things.

And, by elections, we don’t mean campaigns – those are worse than messy; they are legalized madness. What we mean is the actual organizing of an election,  the running of polling places and the process of counting the votes.

Local boards of elections, for the most part, do a superb job of pulling them off.

But we have been covering politics and elections for over 40 years; and can’t remember a single one where something didn’t go wrong on Election Day – either by human error or technology failure or both.

Former congressman Steve Driehaus of Price Hill, who has spent the past four years with the Peace Corps in Swaziland, is moving to Morocco to head the agency's efforts there.

Driehaus made the announcement Friday on his Facebook page.

Eliot Isaac, a long-time police veteran who has been interim chief for nearly three months, is Cincinnati’s new police chief.

In city council chambers at Cincinnati City Hall Thursday morning, City Manager Harry Black made official what most in the department and city hall have believed for months would happen – he appointed Isaac the city’s new police chief.

Black said he never considered any outside candidates for the job.

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