Emily Forman

Emily Forman is a health reporter with Side Effects. Her reporting focuses on addiction recovery, women's health, and sexuality.

Formerly, she was the Senior Producer of Precious Lives, a Peabody Award-nominated podcast covering gun violence in Milwaukee.

Previously Emily worked at KCAW in Sitka, Alaska where she covered everything from Native American fishing traditions to scientific discoveries about ice age goats. Her work has also aired on Alaska Public Radio Network and NPR. Emily was trained in documentary radio production at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Portland, Maine. She graduated from Colby College with a BA in Economics.

Nearly 100,000 people are waiting for a kidney transplant in the U.S., but many will never get one. Instead they’ll stay on dialysis for the rest of their lives. A team of doctors in Philadelphia have found a possible solution to this problem, by infecting patients with a potentially fatal virus.

AIRMAN 1ST CLASS QUAY DRAWDY / U.S. AIR FORCE

Kentucky has one of the worst outbreaks of Hepatitis A in the country, and the liver disease has spread to several other Midwest states including Ohio, Tennessee and Indiana.

Tamitria Jernigan takes her daughter Tashea to the Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital at St. Vincent’s in Indianapolis every three weeks for a blood transfusion. Tashea has a blood disorder known as sickle cell disease, and it caused her to have a stroke when she was two years old. The regular blood transfusions prevent her from having another one.


Doctor Emily Meier usually practices hematology at the Indiana Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center in Indianapolis. But four times a year Meier and her team drive two hours north to Lake County, Indiana and host a clinic for children diagnosed with sickle cell disease.


The National Institutes of Health announced Monday the launch of a large scale clinical trial that will expand efforts to give more HIV positive transplant candidates new kidneys. The new study will track 160 kidney transplants.

New research finds that fentanyl is far more common than heroin in overdose deaths in Indianapolis and that blacks are particularly affected.

In 2017, nearly half of the people who died from an overdose in Marion County, where Indianapolis is located, had fentanyl in their system. Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is up to 100 times stronger than morphine.

When Ronson Rowley was a teen, he said he used to sneak into a nightclub called the Ten Bar. “It was the only black gay club here in Indianapolis,” he recalled. One night he ran into his uncle.

“He looked me dead in the face,” he recalled. “And [he] said what are you doing here? I said, the same thing you’re doing here.”


At the National Black Caucus of State Legislators Conference in Indianapolis,  U.S. Surgeon General and former Indiana Health Commissioner Jerome Adam called for racial equity in addressing the opioid epidemic.