Elizabeth Miller

Reporter/producer Elizabeth Miller joined ideastream after a stint at NPR headquarters in Washington D.C., where she served as an intern on the National Desk, pitching stories about everything from a gentrified Brooklyn deli to an app for lost dogs. Before that, she covered weekend news at WAKR in Akron and interned at WCBE, a Columbus NPR affiliate. Elizabeth grew up in Columbus before moving north to attend Baldwin Wallace, where she graduated with a degree in broadcasting and mass communications.

It may be hard to imagine a composer being inspired by public hearings and court cases. But Lake Erie and its problems take center stage in a new oratorio from Cleveland composer Margaret Brouwer.


The 2017 algae bloom is over in western Lake Erie.  And while it didn’t directly threaten drinking water, its bright green hue prompted national attention and hurt Lake Erie’s tourism business. 


Over the years, billions of dollars have been allocated to restoring the Great Lakes – whether its money spent cleaning up pollution, preventing invasive species, or educating the public.  A new regional initiative will analyze how effective some of these efforts – and dollars – have been so far. 


Lake Erie algea
WKSU

Billions of dollars have been allocated to restoring the Great Lakes – money spent cleaning up pollution, preventing invasive species and educating the public.

A new regional initiative will analyze how effective some of those efforts – and dollars – have been so far.

The Maumee River runs more than 100 miles before emptying into Lake Erie in Ohio. And it carries a lot of the farm runoff that triggers algae blooms.  But a new book explains that there’s more to the river.

Ryan Schnurr spent a week walking and canoeing the length of the river last summer.

He has turned that experience into a book called In the Watershed.  It’s part memoir and part lesson on the Maumee’s place in history.

How do you make people care about the Great Lakes? And why do oceans get all the attention?

"Daily Show" correspondent Michael Kosta answers those questions -- and campaigns for a Great Lakes makeover -- in a hilarious, irreverent piece that aired Tuesday night.

A 600 mile long algae bloom on the Ohio River in 2015.
Jeff Reutter / Ohio Sea Grant via Flickr

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says the Ohio EPA did not fully look at research on harmful algal blooms when considering adding Lake Erie to its list of “impaired” waters.

NASA

Three thousand feet up in the air, Dr. Rafat Ansari flies his small, two-seater plane over Lake Erie.

Mike Harris of the Flint Development Center and John Rumpler of Environment Ohio talk about Flint and Environment Ohio’s Get the Lead Out program.


Algae blooms continue to color western Lake Erie a deep green. Now researchers and scientists want to know more about toxins produced by the algae -- and they’re getting help from some unlikely sources.


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