Dave Rosenthal

Dave Rosenthal is Managing Editor of Great Lakes Today, a collaboration of public media stations that is led by WBFO, ideastream in Cleveland in WXXI in Rochester, and includes other stations in the region.

Dave comes to Buffalo from Baltimore, where he was the investigations/enterprise editor for The Sun. He led projects that won a number of honors, including the Clark Mollenhoff Award for Excellence in Investigative Reporting, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism's Paul Tobenkin Memorial Award and the Investigative Reporters & Editors’ breaking news award. The newsroom’s work on the death of Freddie Gray was recognized by The American Society of News Editors, the Online News Association and the National Headliners Awards, in addition to being named a finalist for a 2016 Pulitzer Prize.

He began his journalism career as a reporter for the Roanoke Times and World-News, where he covered local government, the Virginia General Assembly and business. In Roanoke and Baltimore, he has reported on a wide range of topics and people, including a zoo architect in Seattle, the recovery of a Civil War ironclad off the Atlantic coast and the emerging market economy in the Soviet Union.

A native of New Britain, Conn., Dave has degrees from Wesleyan University and Boston University School of Law.

In his spare time, he can be found biking the roads and trails around Buffalo – and cheering on various sports teams, including the UConn Huskies.

Houston's more than 1,000 miles from the Great Lakes, but the devastation brought by Harvey carries some painful lessons for cities far to the north. As the nation confronts climate change, one of the biggest worries will be the increasing number of storms.


NASA

In the after-glow of Monday's eclipse, we can start looking forward to an even more exciting event for the Midwest and Great Lakes region: the 2024 total solar eclipse.

In the after-glow of Monday's eclipse, we can start looking forward to an even more exciting event for the Great Lakes region: the 2024 total solar eclipse.

The Asian carp captured this summer near the southern tip of Lake Michigan -- triggering a big scare -- apparently slipped past electric barriers.


On most summer days, you’ll find Capt. Rod MacDonald in the Maid of the Mist wheelhouse. It’s a few steps up from the top deck and the hundreds of tourists in blue rain slickers.


Will Congress give $300 million for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative -- or will President Trump be able to cut the money from the federal budget? How can a polluted river be restored to give an economic boost to cities like Buffalo, N.Y., and Duluth, Minn.? How is climate change affecting the lakes?

A new non-native species has been found in western Lake Erie, the EPA said Monday.

It's named Brachionus leydigii. And it's a type of zooplankton, which means it could be food for lots of fish.

Lake Ontario has dropped a foot since heavy spring rains swelled it to record levels. But it's still much higher than normal -- and that means the pain continues for homeowners and businesses along the shore.

So does the controversy over regulators who manage lake levels.

The EPA has released its annual report highlighting work under the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative -- and environmentalists might be surprised by the high praise from Scott Pruitt.

In a statement accompanying the report, Pruitt, who leads the EPA, said the initiative "is protecting public health in the Great Lakes more than any other coordinated interagency effort in U.S. history."

Local officials say human error triggered the smelly black blob that appeared recently near the world-famous Niagara Falls.

In a lengthy statement, the Niagara Falls Water Board says the problem arose as a sedimentation basin was cleaned on July 29. An employee monitoring the operation was called away -- and returned to find that the water being pumped out was discolored.

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