Dave Rosenthal

Dave Rosenthal is Managing Editor of Great Lakes Today, a collaboration of public media stations that is led by WBFO, ideastream in Cleveland in WXXI in Rochester, and includes other stations in the region.

Dave comes to Buffalo from Baltimore, where he was the investigations/enterprise editor for The Sun. He led projects that won a number of honors, including the Clark Mollenhoff Award for Excellence in Investigative Reporting, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism's Paul Tobenkin Memorial Award and the Investigative Reporters & Editors’ breaking news award. The newsroom’s work on the death of Freddie Gray was recognized by The American Society of News Editors, the Online News Association and the National Headliners Awards, in addition to being named a finalist for a 2016 Pulitzer Prize.

He began his journalism career as a reporter for the Roanoke Times and World-News, where he covered local government, the Virginia General Assembly and business. In Roanoke and Baltimore, he has reported on a wide range of topics and people, including a zoo architect in Seattle, the recovery of a Civil War ironclad off the Atlantic coast and the emerging market economy in the Soviet Union.

A native of New Britain, Conn., Dave has degrees from Wesleyan University and Boston University School of Law.

In his spare time, he can be found biking the roads and trails around Buffalo – and cheering on various sports teams, including the UConn Huskies.

Across public broadcasting, folks are mourning for Michigan Radio's Mark Brush. He died last week of brain cancer, at the age of 49.

Brush is remembered as a smart, funny colleague, as well as an excellent journalist whose worked often touched the Great Lakes.

The nation's rush to increase oil production is having a long-distance impact on the Great Lakes region.

Geologic formations have given parts of the region ample deposits of sand, including the hard, round version that is used in fracking. Seen from space a few months ago by the Landsat 8 satellite, the light brown mines dot a landscape of green fields and forests. 

Many advocates for the Great Lakes are in Washington, D.C., this week to push back against President Trump's proposal to slash funding for the region. They want Congress to continue its bipartisan support on issues such as cleaning up pollution and protecting drinking water.

For Christians, the weeks leading up to Easter are a time of sacrifice. And many observe by giving up chocolate, alcohol or other treats.

But the Anglican Church has another suggestion this year. It's urging members to take the Lent Plastics Challenge and reduce their use of straws, cups, bottles and many other plastic products.

Alliance for the Great Lakes

A politically divided America finds little common ground on the environment, according to a national survey by the Pew Research Center.

A politically divided America finds little common ground on the environment, according to a national survey by the Pew Research Center.

Although 81 percent of Democrats said protecting the environment should be a top priority, only 37 percent of Republicans agreed. And though 68 percent of Democrats said dealing with climate change should be a top priority, just 18 percent of Republicans agreed.

President Trump's continued push to slash funding for environmental programs would have a huge impact on the Great Lakes region.

His 2019 spending plan would cut funding for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative from $300 million to $30 million. That money pays for a wide range of projects, including pollution cleanup, wetlands restoration and wildlife protection.

Paul Sancya / Associated Press

President Trump pushed again Monday to slash funding for the Great Lakes -- repeating a move he made unsuccessfully last year.

President Trump pushed Monday to slash funding for the Great Lakes -- repeating a move he made last year.

Trump released a budget proposal that would slash funding for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative from $300 million annually to $30 million.

Have you ever wanted to travel on a Great Lakes freighter? For a mere $20, you can enter a raffle for a five-day trip, courtesy of a Michigan museum.

The raffle, being held by the Icebreaker Mackinaw Maritime Museum, offers a chance to ride this summer on the Wilfred Sykes or another ship in the Central Marine Logistics fleet.

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