Dave Rosenthal

Dave Rosenthal is Managing Editor of Great Lakes Today, a collaboration of public media stations that is led by WBFO, ideastream in Cleveland in WXXI in Rochester, and includes other stations in the region.

Dave comes to Buffalo from Baltimore, where he was the investigations/enterprise editor for The Sun. He led projects that won a number of honors, including the Clark Mollenhoff Award for Excellence in Investigative Reporting, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism's Paul Tobenkin Memorial Award and the Investigative Reporters & Editors’ breaking news award. The newsroom’s work on the death of Freddie Gray was recognized by The American Society of News Editors, the Online News Association and the National Headliners Awards, in addition to being named a finalist for a 2016 Pulitzer Prize.

He began his journalism career as a reporter for the Roanoke Times and World-News, where he covered local government, the Virginia General Assembly and business. In Roanoke and Baltimore, he has reported on a wide range of topics and people, including a zoo architect in Seattle, the recovery of a Civil War ironclad off the Atlantic coast and the emerging market economy in the Soviet Union.

A native of New Britain, Conn., Dave has degrees from Wesleyan University and Boston University School of Law.

In his spare time, he can be found biking the roads and trails around Buffalo – and cheering on various sports teams, including the UConn Huskies.

Forty years ago this week, federal officials declared a western New York neighborhood to be a disaster area. That action in Niagara Falls -- in an area that came to be known as Love Canal -- highlighted the threat of industrial pollution across America.

Michigan Radio's Environment Report has a fascinating tale about Nate Nieto, who has received more than 16,000 ticks by mail.

It's part of a citizen science project that the Northern Arizona University associate professor organized to  learn about the diseases ticks transmit and map risk levels.

Invasive mussels don't get a lot of love around the Great Lakes, because they take food from other animals and carpet much of the lake floor.

But Michigan State researchers say quagga mussels may actually doing some good.

Scott Pruitt has resigned as head of the Environmental Protection Agency, President Trump announced Thursday via Twitter.

Pruitt has been dogged by criticism over his use of EPA staffers and funds. But in the Great Lakes region, moves by Trump and Pruitt to roll back environmental regulations also triggered concern.

Algae blooms have started in western Lake Erie, and a researchers say the unusually warm weather may make things worse.

Scientists predict the bloom will be smaller than it was last year, when large swaths of the lake were colored a sickly green. But a federal government forecast says it still could be one of the four or five worst blooms since 2002.

President Trump traveled to Wisconsin today for the ground-breaking of a sprawling high-tech factory where Foxconn will make LCD panels.

Wisconsin used huge incentives to attract the Taiwan company's plant, which is expected to employ some 13,000 workers.  

But the plant also has sparked debate because it will use millions of gallons of water each day from Lake Michigan.

On June 16, 1962, The New Yorker published one of those articles that aspires to -- and achieves -- something much larger. The first part of the series was called Silent Spring-I, and Rachel Carson's words (later converted to book form) became the anthem of America's fledgling environmental movement.

Her article began simply, like a fairy tale: "There was once a town in the heart of America where all life seemed to be in harmony with its surroundings ... .

A new study explains how the bloody red shrimp -- and other non-native species -- can travel across the Great Lakes. It's pretty simple: They hitch a ride in the ballast tanks of "lakers," the ships that travel around the lakes, but never make it out to the ocean.

Roger C / Flickr

Environmentalists are praising the U.S. Senate for blocking a measure loosening shipping regulations on the Great Lakes – and making it easier for invasive species to foul those waters.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / Associated Press

The federal government has played a huge role in reviving the Great Lakes, but some in the region wonder how strong that support is these days.

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