Dave Rosenthal

Dave Rosenthal is Managing Editor of Great Lakes Today, a collaboration of public media stations that is led by WBFO, ideastream in Cleveland in WXXI in Rochester, and includes other stations in the region.

Dave comes to Buffalo from Baltimore, where he was the investigations/enterprise editor for The Sun. He led projects that won a number of honors, including the Clark Mollenhoff Award for Excellence in Investigative Reporting, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism's Paul Tobenkin Memorial Award and the Investigative Reporters & Editors’ breaking news award. The newsroom’s work on the death of Freddie Gray was recognized by The American Society of News Editors, the Online News Association and the National Headliners Awards, in addition to being named a finalist for a 2016 Pulitzer Prize.

He began his journalism career as a reporter for the Roanoke Times and World-News, where he covered local government, the Virginia General Assembly and business. In Roanoke and Baltimore, he has reported on a wide range of topics and people, including a zoo architect in Seattle, the recovery of a Civil War ironclad off the Atlantic coast and the emerging market economy in the Soviet Union.

A native of New Britain, Conn., Dave has degrees from Wesleyan University and Boston University School of Law.

In his spare time, he can be found biking the roads and trails around Buffalo – and cheering on various sports teams, including the UConn Huskies.

If you like ice, you have to love the Great Lakes, where it comes in all shapes and sizes. With the recent deep freeze, we're seeing a lot more ice than in the past few winters -- including a frosty Niagara Falls. ​Here's a look at some unusual shapes and sizes:

The past year was loaded with turmoil for the Great Lakes. A new president tried to cut $300 million in  restoration projects. Homes were flooded along Lake Ontario. And one of the scariest invasive species -- the Asian carp -- was found less than 10 miles from Lake Michigan.

Here's a look at some of the biggest stories that Great Lakes Today brought you -- from New York to Minnesota, as well as the provinces of Quebec and Ontario. 

The appointment of Cathy Stepp to lead a regional EPA office that covers most of the Great Lakes is drawing praise and criticism.

EPA adminstrator Scott Pruitt says her background as a Wisconsin official and small business owner "will bring a fresh perspective to EPA as we look to implement President Trump’s agenda."

But Henry Henderson, the Natural Resources Defense Council’s Midwest director, told the AP that Stepp’s record fits with the administration's "lax mode of enforcement.”

The Great Lakes/St. Lawrence River make up the world's biggest freshwater system -- and an enormously valuable resource. It supplies drinking water for millions of residents and powers the region's economy.

Last year, 42 million gallons were withdrawn from the basin each day, according to a new report from the Great Lakes Commission. Here's where it went.

Buffalo has transformed a failing school into Riverside Academy, a high school that prepares students for jobs in aquaculture, tourism and other sectors of the "Blue Economy."

The location is perfect: Riverside is within walking distance of the Niagara River, which flows from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario.

And as WBFO reports, the school is partnering with SUNY Buffalo State, Buffalo Niagara Waterkeeper and Buffalo Maritime Center. 

The Christmas spirit is popping up along the waters of the Great Lakes region.

In Port Huron, Mich., Santa Claus rode to shore on the Huron Spirit, a boat operated by the Lakes Pilots Association. In Toledo, Ohio, the tug Josephine brought him to the National Museum of the Great Lakes.

But the most poignant event of the holiday season was in Chicago, where the sinking of  "The Christmas Tree Ship" was remembered recently.

If you enjoy Great Lakes Today's coverage -- from environmental cleanups to development to art -- the perfect way to show your gratitude is by supporting public broadcasting.

We're a collaboration of public radio stations across the region, led by WBFO Buffalo, ideastream Cleveland and WXXI Rochester. Although you can't donate directly to Great Lakes Today, a gift to any station in the region supports our work.

The state of Michigan and Enbridge Inc. have settled on new safety measures for Line 5, the 645-mile oil and gas pipeline that crosses the Straits of Mackinac.

The agreement, announced Monday, requires Enbridge to halt transmissions during "adverse weather," replace a section of the pipeline and make other changes along the underwater route where Lakes Michigan and Huron meet.

New York artist Alexis Rockman describes his paintings of the Great Lakes as "natural history psychedelia." And just one look at the surreal, mural-size canvases -- bursting with color and energy -- shows why.

What better time than Thanksgiving to re-examine the Decolonizing Diet Project? It aims to improve the health of Native Americans by focusing on foods that existed before Europeans came to North America. 

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