Dave Rosenthal

Dave Rosenthal is Managing Editor of Great Lakes Today, a collaboration of public media stations that is led by WBFO, ideastream in Cleveland in WXXI in Rochester, and includes other stations in the region.

Dave comes to Buffalo from Baltimore, where he was the investigations/enterprise editor for The Sun. He led projects that won a number of honors, including the Clark Mollenhoff Award for Excellence in Investigative Reporting, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism's Paul Tobenkin Memorial Award and the Investigative Reporters & Editors’ breaking news award. The newsroom’s work on the death of Freddie Gray was recognized by The American Society of News Editors, the Online News Association and the National Headliners Awards, in addition to being named a finalist for a 2016 Pulitzer Prize.

He began his journalism career as a reporter for the Roanoke Times and World-News, where he covered local government, the Virginia General Assembly and business. In Roanoke and Baltimore, he has reported on a wide range of topics and people, including a zoo architect in Seattle, the recovery of a Civil War ironclad off the Atlantic coast and the emerging market economy in the Soviet Union.

A native of New Britain, Conn., Dave has degrees from Wesleyan University and Boston University School of Law.

In his spare time, he can be found biking the roads and trails around Buffalo – and cheering on various sports teams, including the UConn Huskies.

For the anniversary of the Edmund Fitzgerald's final voyage, mlive has put together an interactive graphic about the doomed freighter. It provides some of the radio chatter that surrounded the freighter as it was pummeled by a powerful storm on Lake Superior.

Today is the 50th anniversary of the law that led to our nation's public television and radio systems. Great Lakes Today -- a collaborative led by WBFO Buffalo, ideastream Cleveland and WXXI Rochester -- is a part of that system. So we're ready to celebrate.

For decades, the Great Lakes have offered locations for corporate magnates to build luxurious houses with remarkable water views. But it's tough to match the pair of Chicago mansions up for sale -- for $22 million -- along the shore of Lake Michigan.

The Great Lakes offer lots of spookiness -- from century-old shipwrecks to blood-sucking animals. For Halloween, we pulled together some of the creepiest photos. Take a look -- if you dare.

For anyone who doubts the power of the Great Lakes, now's the time for a reset.

This week, data buoys on Lake Superior recorded 28.8-foot waves, according to the Great Lakes Observing System.

Gord Downie was more than the lead singer for The Tragically Hip, more than a Canadian rock icon.

Downie, who died recently of brain cancer, also was a great friend of the Great Lakes. Especially Lake Ontario, where he learned to swim.

Capt. Rod MacDonald has been piloting Niagara Falls tour boats for 29 years. He's seen a lot on the Maid of the Mist -- from anniversary celebrations to fatal jumps over Horseshoe Falls.

But some things stay the same: He wants his passengers to experience the falls up close. And he wants to keep them safe amid the swirling, churning waters. 

Hidden in plain sight in northern Michigan is a rustic getaway where wealthy Americans have hiked, fished and relaxed for more than a century. The Huron Mountain Club spreads along the south shore of Lake Superior, running across more than 20,000 acres of land and water.

And it only 50 regular members.

As a deadline approaches for Lake Ontario flood victims to seek state aid, there are indications that the money may be stretched thin.

At the eastern end of the lake, about $1 million already has been committed to 45 homeowners in a three-county area, WRVO reports. 

But more than 900 homeowners have applied for help in Oswego, Jefferson and St. Lawrence counties, says Gary Beasley, who heads a nonprofit administering area flood grants.

A $275 million plan to keep Asian carp from reaching Lake Michigan -- and the Great Lakes system -- drew both criticism and praise at a hearing in Chicago.

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