Clare Roth

All Things Considered Host

Clare Roth joined WOSU in February of 2017. After attending the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, she returned to her native Iowa as a producer for Iowa Public Radio.

Besides her affinity for four-letter flyover states and Big Ten schools, Clare is a big fan of stand-up comedy, ice skating, and indie theaters. An incurable word nerd, she can usually be found at the library.

Ways to Connect

The Ohio State University

Franklin County Municipal Court will now offer LGBT-specific domestic violence intervention. Municipal Court Judges Eileen Paley and James O’Grady devised the program after same-sex marriage became legal in all 50 states. 

Pixabay

As college students stress about landing their first job, the question of how their grade point average will impact their chances looms large. It may seem like the equation should be simple: the better the grade point average, the bigger the edge.

Clare Roth / WOSU

Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, said he’s encouraged by the approach of Ohio State University researchers in tackling the opioid crisis.

Rogelio V. Solis / Associated Press

The first day of spring is bringing a Winter Weather Advisory in Central Ohio. And while the snow begins to come down, legislators in an Ohio House committee will be considering a new way to remove ice from the roads - using the byproduct of fracking

Clare Roth / WOSU

The Short North Food Hall offers five different restaurants where you can grab food, place it on a tray, and take it back to your table with a cocktail. Just don’t call it a cafeteria.

Esther Honig

The Central Ohio Transit Authority has a new leader: Joanna Pinkerton.

Courtesy of Zahir Janmohamed

The creators of the podcast "Racist Sandwich" know that its title might take some by surprise.

Clare Roth / WOSU

Home means a few different things for Ismail Mohamed. 

John Locher / Associated Press

When Columbus made Amazon’s list of finalists for the tech giant’s second headquarters, critics had one major concern: the city’s transportation system. With talk of a Hyperloop once again in the air and a Smart City project in the works, how citizens get around Columbus has become a pressing question. 

Two Dollar Radio

Hanif Abdurraqib, the author of the acclaimed essay collection They Can’t Kill Us Until They Kill Us, announced a two-book deal with Random House last month. But the vote of confidence from a major New York City-based publisher hasn’t lessened his dedication for his home city of Columbus.

University of Dayton

There's an old adage: The first step to change is knowing you have a problem. Kelly Cushion, a software design engineer at University of Dayton's Research Institute, decided to take it one step further. 

She wants to change the brain chemistry of people addicted to opioids to help them see they have a problem.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / Associated Press

Robyn Wilson, associate professor of risk analysis and decision science at The Ohio State University, had served on the EPA’s Science Advisory Board for nearly two and a half years when she received a request to step down. The problem, it seemed, was the fact her research had been funded by an EPA grant. 

Erin Clark / WOUB

Almost a year to date after the 2017 Women’s March, Central Ohio women are taking to the street once again. On Saturday, as part of a national day of protest, a “Power to the Polls” march will begin at the Greater Columbus Convention Center and end at the Statehouse.

Job seekers at one of two fulfillment centers in Central Ohio.
Esther Honig / WOSU

Columbus’ promises of big tax breaks and investments in transportation seem to have caught the attention of Amazon, which named the city one of 20 finalists for the site of its second corporate headquarters.

Civic Arts Project

Columbus has released its Art On High strategic vision, as part of a plan to spend $420,000 of city money on public art along High Street, from Goodale to Ninth Avenue.

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