Cheryl Dring

Classical 101 Program Director

Classical 101 Program Director Cheryl Dring moved to Columbus in 2016, having worked in public radio since college. With stops in Austin, Madison, Dayton, Sacramento, New Orleans, Baton Rouge and Shreveport, Louisiana, she has seen much of the country through the lens of public radio and local arts.

“While every community is different in some ways, what every station I’ve worked for has in common is the passion its listeners share for the music — and their commitment to having a local home for it on the radio,” Cheryl said. 

A lifelong bookworm, Cheryl headed off to college in Louisiana with the idea of becoming an English professor. Music soon took over, though, and the English major wound up getting a degree in vocal performance instead. Touring the world with her college choir stoked a love for travel and a curiosity about the world, both of which continue to this day.

She earned a Master of Music degree in vocal performance from Louisiana State University, studying with the renowned Verdi soprano Martina Arroyo.

So, what do you do with a couple of music degrees and years of training in languages and writing? Well, classical music radio makes a lot of sense! What had been a part-time job during college and grad school eventually became a career path.

“People who’ve known me all my life are just glad I found a career in which talking is actually a job skill!” Cheryl said.

When not making radio, Cheryl enjoys gardening, cooking, exploring new restaurants, looking at historic homes and trying to keep up with the friends she has made across the country.

Ways to Connect

You may have noticed a new voice on the air here at Classical 101. Here's a little introduction to our new afternoon host, Kent Teeters.

Wikimedia Commons

Maybe we have Antiques Roadshow to thank. Because of the cultural phenomenon of that PBS television show, many of us view anything found in an attic, basement or forgotten closet as a potential treasure. And now in the Digital Age, it’s easier than ever to quickly research and back up a hunch about the value of found items.

New finds and rediscoveries can even amend history as we know it. Composer Florence Price has been, in large part due to race and gender, a footnote in American musical history when she should have been a chapter. But an unlikely unearthing of Price papers has revived her story and brought to light music that was thought to be lost.

Jessica Lewis / Pexels

Where did the year go? While December can really pile on the stress with winter weather, holiday preparations, work deadlines and family visits, it’s also the time for some of the most sublime, glorious music in the cycle of the year.

As 2017 draws to a close, the music of Chanukah and Christmas reminds so many of us of our treasured holiday traditions. 

We have a full slate of special programs scheduled to air on Classical 101 this month, in addition to holiday editions of our regular shows.

Nick Amoscato / Flickr

As a kid growing up in Louisiana, you never knew whether you’d be wearing shorts or sweaters for Christmas, so it was sometimes difficult to get in the "holiday spirit" you see depicted in cards and commercials. 

No snow-capped trees, no children sledding happily down icy hills — no snow at all, as a matter of fact. We used to spray fake snow on our Christmas tree to create the illusion of winter. I can still smell it.

The one surefire way to make it feel like Christmas was music. Even if the air conditioning was on, you could still plug in the tree lights, crank up the record player (yes, I'm that old) and pretend people were bundled up and bustling around, doing wintry activities.

Jonathan Tichler / Metropolitan Opera

This past weekend, many of us eagerly listened to the Metropolitan Opera’s performance of Giuseppe Verdi’s Requiem only to have our hearts sink within the day. James Levine’s much-heralded return to the podium coincided with breaking news of multiple allegations of sexual abuse by the conductor.

Ghost jack-o-lantern halloween pumpkin
Renislava / Pixabay

With any scary movie, the perfect soundtrack is key — so why not a soundtrack for your Halloween party?

This playlist could certainly play in the background for your spooky celebrations, or you could use it to make the little kids think twice about ringing the doorbell for candy!

The National Archives UK / Wikimedia Commons

While you've been putting the finishing touches on your Halloween costume, we've been working on special music for the holiday! The American Sound, Sunday Baroque and Essential Classics will feature spooktacular programming leading up to Oct. 31.

color photo of person reading a book on a hammock
Pixabay

Maybe you’ve dipped your toe into classical music and liked it. Are you ready to venture a little deeper into the pool?

A number of years ago, I remember playing Debussy’s “Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun” and commenting on air that it always made me want to curl up in a hammock under a sunbeam with a good book.