Ashton Marra

Ashton Marra covers the Capitol for West Virginia Public Radio and can be heard weekdays on West Virginia Morning, the station’s daily radio news program. Ashton can also be heard Sunday evenings as she brings you state headlines during NPR’s weekend edition of All Things Considered. She joined the news team in October of 2012.

During the legislative session, Ashton focuses on the state Senate, bringing daily reports from the inner-workings of the state’s upper house on West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s nightly television show The Legislature Today.

Ashton comes to WVPBS from ABC News’ morning program Good Morning America where she worked as a production associate. Ashton produced pieces for the broadcast, including the first identified victim of the Aurora, CO, movie theater shooting and the 2012 Summer Olympic Games, as well as multiple entertainment news stories.

Before her time at GMA, Ashton worked as an intern on ABC’s news assignment desk, helping to organize coverage of major news stories like the Trayvon Martin case, the Jerry Sandusky trail, tornadoes that ravaged the South and Midwest and the 2012 Presidential election. She also spent 18 months as a weekend reporter for WDTV based in her hometown of Clarksburg, WV, breaking the story of missing Lewis County toddler Aliayah Lunsford. Ashton’s work from that story was feature on HLN’s Nancy Grace in October of 2011.

Ashton graduated summa cum laude from West Virginia University in May of 2012, where she was named WVU’s Reporter of the Year. She covered government for the P.I. Reed School of Journalism’s bi-weekly newscast WVU News and also served a semester as the WVPBS bureau reporter.

When she isn’t reporting, Ashton enjoys cooking and is an avid supporter of the arts, including theater, music and dance. She is a huge fan of musicals and touts her collection of Playbills from the Broadway musicals she’s attended, which grew by nearly 30 in her 9 months living in New York City.

 

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More than three-quarters of Ohio high school seniors are on track to graduate in May, with another 19 percent “highly likely” to meet requirements to receive their diplomas.

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The best way to predict whether a student will cheat in the classroom is a personality trait, says a researcher at The Ohio State University.

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A new national study of student loan debt says college graduates in Ohio last year left school owing an average of $30,000.

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Nearly one-third of teachers in Ohio's traditional public schools are chronically absent, but the rate in charter schools is significantly less. That’s according to a report released this week by the right-leaning Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank that operates more than a dozen charter schools in the state.

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After prayers in both English and Spanish asking for guidance for local and national leaders, nearly 50 members of the Forest Hill Presbyterian Church and surrounding community stood on the steps of the Cleveland Heights chapel in support of Leonor Garcia.

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