Ashton Marra

Ashton Marra covers the Capitol for West Virginia Public Radio and can be heard weekdays on West Virginia Morning, the station’s daily radio news program. Ashton can also be heard Sunday evenings as she brings you state headlines during NPR’s weekend edition of All Things Considered. She joined the news team in October of 2012.

During the legislative session, Ashton focuses on the state Senate, bringing daily reports from the inner-workings of the state’s upper house on West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s nightly television show The Legislature Today.

Ashton comes to WVPBS from ABC News’ morning program Good Morning America where she worked as a production associate. Ashton produced pieces for the broadcast, including the first identified victim of the Aurora, CO, movie theater shooting and the 2012 Summer Olympic Games, as well as multiple entertainment news stories.

Before her time at GMA, Ashton worked as an intern on ABC’s news assignment desk, helping to organize coverage of major news stories like the Trayvon Martin case, the Jerry Sandusky trail, tornadoes that ravaged the South and Midwest and the 2012 Presidential election. She also spent 18 months as a weekend reporter for WDTV based in her hometown of Clarksburg, WV, breaking the story of missing Lewis County toddler Aliayah Lunsford. Ashton’s work from that story was feature on HLN’s Nancy Grace in October of 2011.

Ashton graduated summa cum laude from West Virginia University in May of 2012, where she was named WVU’s Reporter of the Year. She covered government for the P.I. Reed School of Journalism’s bi-weekly newscast WVU News and also served a semester as the WVPBS bureau reporter.

When she isn’t reporting, Ashton enjoys cooking and is an avid supporter of the arts, including theater, music and dance. She is a huge fan of musicals and touts her collection of Playbills from the Broadway musicals she’s attended, which grew by nearly 30 in her 9 months living in New York City.

 

A classroom at Cleveland's John Hay High School.
Ashton Marra / Ideastream

Ohio Board of Education members will wait until the fall to consider a resolution that proposes some drastic changes to the state report cards for schools and school districts. A delay on the resolution doesn’t mean the end of discussions about potential modifications.

James Family Foundation / Facebook

LeBron James is taking his NBA career out west next season, officially signing with the Los Angeles Lakers on Monday night. But in northeast Ohio, James’ philanthropic endeavors will continue.

Pxhere

Federal law requires students with disabilities to spend as much time as possible in general education classrooms, but a study from Ohio State University has found that’s not happening in Ohio, or the rest of the country.

More than 140,000 Ohio students are preparing to enter their senior year of high school, but for thousands of them, the year won’t end with a walk across a stage in a cap and gown. That is unless lawmakers move the graduation goal post once again.

It’s a lingering question that’s creating uncertainty for rising seniors in the state’s high schools.

Ja’Mya and Kenmore-Garfield’s Class of 2019

Sixteen-year-old Ja’Mya Goley is about a month away from starting her senior year at Kenmore-Garfield High School in Akron.

A classroom at Cleveland's John Hay High School.
Ashton Marra / Ideastream

More than 100,000 Ohio teachers who are members of their local unions could soon feel the impact of a U.S. Supreme Court decision Wednesday.

children with crayons
Pixabay

More than 100,000 Ohio children, and more than 1 million children under the age of five nationwide, are at risk of going uncounted in the 2020 Census.

A Hilliard schools student completes classroom work with an iPad.
Columbus Neighborhoods / WOSU

A national report on childhood well-being ranks Ohio 16th in the nation for the education of its kids.

The national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released the findings of its 2017 Youth Risk Behavior Survey Thursday, measuring the rates of drug use, instances of violence and suicidal thoughts and actions among the nation’s teens.

Fewer teenagers are using drugs and having sex, according to the survey results, but there are still many areas of concern for the public health agency.

Drug Use

School bus
Flickr / Creative Commons

The debate over Ohio’s school report cards continues in Columbus this week as state Board of Education members consider a recommendation to make even more changes to the grades.

Harris and Mandi Jaffe are 16-year-old rising juniors at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.
Provided Photo

Mandi and Harris Jaffe were both on the campus of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on February 14 when a former student started firing.

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