April Laissle

April Laissle is a graduate of Ohio University and comes to WYSO from WOUB Public Media in Athens, Ohio where she worked as a weekend host and reporter.  There, she reported on everything from food insecurity to 4-H chicken competitions. April interned at KQED Public Radio in San Francisco, where she focused on health reporting. She also worked on The Broad Experience, a New-York based podcast about women and workplace issues. In her spare time, April loves traveling, trying new recipes and binge-listening to podcasts. April is a Florida native and has been adjusting to Ohio weather since 2011.

New tests show low levels of a common toxin have leaked into Dayton’s drinking water supply. City officials believe the toxin is coming from Wright Patterson Air Force Base.

Tests done by the city found very low levels of chemicals known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances or PFAS in the drinking water supply. The contaminants had previously been found in raw groundwater.

About 100 people rallied against the Trump Administration’s immigration policies at a protest Thursday in front of Representative Mike Turner’s office in downtown Dayton.

A city program that transformed parking meters into brightly colored charitable donations sites has announced its collection totals from its first year of operation.

Wright State University’s Board of Trustees officially approved the school’s 2019 budget at a meeting Friday. The plan includes another round of layoffs. It's the latest chapter in the school's months-long effort to avoid being placed on state fiscal watch.

Wright State President Cheryl Schrader says as many as 40 positions could be eliminated during the coming fiscal year beginning July 1. She says some of those cuts could come through attrition.

The Dayton chapter of the NAACP has launched an effort to remove the City of Dayton's recently reactivated traffic cameras.

The Dayton City Commission recently passed a law effectively banning panhandling along 51 major roadways. It’s not the first time the city has passed laws curbing the practice. Now, some legal advocates are already raising questions about the city’s new pedestrian safety ordinance.

At the May 23 city commission meeting, Mayor Nan Whaley was clear: the ordinance is not about panhandling.

“Nothing in this ordinance criminalizes holding a sign on the side of a roadway,” the mayor said.

UPDATE: Paige Patterson has resigned from Cedarville University's Board of Trustees, according to a university official.  His name was removed from the school's website Friday. Cedarville spokesperson Clem Boyd told WYSO Patterson's resignation is effective immediately, but declined to comment further. 


Wright State University President Cheryl Schrader today announced the school is set to add millions of dollars to its cash reserves this year. But that may not be enough to keep the school off the state’s fiscal watch list.

In an email to campus this morning, Schrader said the school is projected to add $7.2M to its reserve fund this fiscal year. That’s $1.2M more than Wright State officials said would be needed to avoid state watch earlier this year.

Dayton City Commissioners unanimously passed an ordinance effectively banning panhandling along many major roadways in Dayton. 

The new law prohibits pedestrians from coming within three feet of an operating vehicle on 51 busy roadways in the city. It would also penalize motorists who slow down or deviate from traffic lanes to interact with pedestrians.

A member of Cedarville University’s board of trustees has been removed from his role as president of the Texas Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary.

Paige Patterson, 75, who has also served on Cedarville’s board of trustees since 2013, was stripped of his seminary leadership position after years-old controversial comments he made about women resurfaced. 

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