Ann Thompson

With more than 20 years of journalism experience in the Greater Cincinnati market, Ann Thompson brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise to her reporting. She has reported for WKRC, WCKY, WHIO-TV, Metro Networks and CBS/ABC Radio. Her work has been recognized by the Associated Press and the Society of Professional Journalists. In 2011 A-P named her “Best Reporter” for large market radio in Ohio. She has won awards from the Association of Women in Communications and the Alliance for Women in Media. Ann reports regularly on science and technology in Focus on Technology.

She has reported from India, Japan, South Korea, Germany and Belgium as part of fellowships from the East-West Center and RIAS.

Why Did He Do It?

Sep 7, 2018

Cincinnati Police say they still don't know why Omar Enrique Santa-Perez came to downtown Cincinnati, entered the Fifth Third Tower and opened fire Thursday. He shot five people. Three of them died. Police killed him minutes later.

Updated: 6:25 p.m.  

Cincinnati Police responded to a call of an active shooter at the Fifth Third Bank building on Fountain Square early Thursday morning. The shooter is dead along with three of his victims. Two others were hospitalized. 

Researchers at The Ohio State University College of Medicine and the Wexner Medical Center have discovered high levels of the hormone aldosterone, already associated with high blood pressure, more than double the chances of a person getting type 2 diabetes. For African-Americans, the risk is almost three-fold. Chinese-Americans are 10 times more likely to develop diabetes.

The Butler County Sheriff's Department, the Hamilton City Health Department and the Butler County Board of Health are taking extra precautions to stop the spread of Hepatitis A after two inmates were diagnosed.

An employee of the Lee's Famous Recipe Chicken in Florence is the latest food service worker to test positive for hepatitis A. The Northern Kentucky Health Department says the employee was infectious while working on August 25 and 26.

Cincinnati Public Schools take possession of two schools this weekend that should help the district deal with increased enrollment.

Once badly burned bears from previous California wildfires are back in their habitat thanks to the healing power of fish skins. It was a University of California at Davis veterinarian who first tried bandages made from sterlized tilapia skins on the bears, the first-ever use on animals.

Low-income Hamilton County residents wrongly facing eviction, struggling with third-party debt collection cases and small claims issues have a new legal resource. The Help Center, located right inside the Hamilton County Courthouse, is run by the Municipal Court, the Clerk's Office and the University of Cincinnati's College of Law.

More dockless scooters and bikes are coming to Cincinnati. Xavier University has contracted with Lime to supply them.

After two years, Moose and Donni are still together. Moose is a chocolate lab and Donni, a cheetah. The Cincinnati Zoo paired the two up in 2016 so Donni could learn to run and play given that he didn't have any brothers or sisters who could teach him.

Some lung cancer nodules are very small and undetectable until they grow larger, and that can signal a poor prognosis for the patient. Even if they are discovered at an early stage, finding them during surgery can be challening. But UC Health is seeing success detecting and marking the nodules with a procedure using radioactive material and a special probe that acts as a Geiger counter.

A CT machine, similar to those found in hospitals, is now in operation at Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport and at more than a dozen other airports across the country. This more advanced technology allows passengers to keep liquids and laptops inside their bags while going through security.

With the Western & Southern Open in full swing, the Mason tournament says it is seeing record crowds. Monday broke a record, and officials are looking for equally big crowds Tuesday night with Roger Federer and Serena Williams taking Center Court.

Kroger, Clifton Market and other grocery stores are taking a closer look at biodegradable packaging for fruits and vegetables, thanks in part to the efforts of farmers like Linda Fritz, who refuse to put their products in so-called plastic clam shells.

Smart Cities around the world are at risk of getting hacked in everything from traffic control to flood prevention even as they spend $81 billion globally this year on data sensors to collect and integrate information. That's according to researchers from IBM Security and the data security firm Threatcare.

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