Ann Thompson

With more than 20 years of journalism experience in the Greater Cincinnati market, Ann Thompson brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise to her reporting. She has reported for WKRC, WCKY, WHIO-TV, Metro Networks and CBS/ABC Radio. Her work has been recognized by the Associated Press and the Society of Professional Journalists. In 2011 A-P named her “Best Reporter” for large market radio in Ohio. She has won awards from the Association of Women in Communications and the Alliance for Women in Media. Ann reports regularly on science and technology in Focus on Technology.

She has reported from India, Japan, South Korea, Germany and Belgium as part of fellowships from the East-West Center and RIAS.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Sam DuBose's brother Aubrey says he will not give up, despite two hung juries and a decision not to try former University of Cincinnati Police officer Ray Tensing a third time in Hamilton County Court.

There's an extra buzz in the air in Fresno, California. That's because the city's Consolidated Mosquito Abatement District (CMAD) is releasing an estimated 20 million sterile mosquitoes this summer in a plan  using bacteria to drastically cut into the insect population.

University of Cincinnati researchers are preparing to study the scope of human trafficking in Ohio, specifically minors under 18 and youth ages 18-21 in foster care. The last such study was in 2010.

The Ohio Office of Criminal Justice (OCJS) has awarded $100,000 to Assistant Professor Dr. Valerie Anderson and her team for the study which will report results in the fall of 2018.

Sam DuBose's brother Aubrey says he will not give up despite two hung juries and a decision not to retry former UC Police Officer Ray Tensing a third time in Hamilton County Court.

He called for federal charges while at a Saturday night rally on Fountain Square where demonstrators also marched to The Banks. "Sam's death is going to bring about a lot of changes," he said, "We're going to take it to the federal level."

Night after night U.S. Customers and Border Protection Officers flag suspicious DHL packages that often turn out to be filled with synthetic drugs.

Chances are you probably don't spend a lot of time in the "dark web." It's the part of the Internet that's populated by drug dealers, child pornographers, and sex traffickers. They access it by the browser Tor and can remain anonymous.

A petroleum company that GE bought in June is investing $4 million to build an innovation and business hub in Sharonville.

The U.S. Justice Department says there is insufficient evidence to prove a white Beavercreek Police Officer  violated federal civil rights laws when he shot and killed a black Walmart customer three years ago.

The Cincinnati Zoo is thrilled that baby hippo Fiona, her mom Bibi and her dad Henry all got in the pool together for the first time Tuesday morning and bonded.  And the zoo quickly posted the family picture on social media.

“The introduction lasted about an hour, and we couldn’t be more pleased with how it went,” said Christina Gorsuch, curator of mammals at the Cincinnati Zoo. “Fiona has been exploring the outdoor habitat with her mom for several weeks and has had contact with Henry inside, but today was the first time that the three hippos have been together. "

Technology three decades old is grabbing the attention of Cincinnati doctors as a possible substitute for drugs and surgical procedures for treating heart patients.

A Mt. Adams hillside, where dirt and a huge concrete blocks came crashing down into a couple of townhouses two months ago, is nearly stabilized.

Ok, I have to admit I set up a choice assignment for myself; getting a closer look at, and taste of, the three Maverick Chocolate bars declared winners at The International Chocolate Awards June 27, 2017 in New York.

Complex computer software may be the key to correctly diagnosing and treating patients with various diseases.

A sure sign the opioid epidemic is getting worse is when Greater Cincinnati cyclists start seeing evidence of drugged drivers every two to three days. A forum is planned Thursday to help cyclists stay alive.

The Ohio Bioscience Growth Report, released Monday, says the industry generates billions of dollars for the state and is continuing to grow.

Kenton County, already busy cranking out start-up technology companies in Covington, is ramping up efforts to increase its tech footprint.

Thousands of people celebrated the life of an American college student who was detained in North Korea for over a year and died shortly after being returned to Ohio. 

It appears we might never know the exact cause of death for Otto Warmbier, a Wyoming High School grad held in North Korea for 17 months for allegedly stealing a propaganda poster.

Update June 20, noon: A public funeral service for Otto Warmbier is scheduled for Thursday June 22 at Wyoming High School at 9:00 a.m.

Burial will be at Oak Hills Cemetery, according to Spring Grove which owns that cemetery.

UC researchers have figured out a way to non-invasively peek inside the brain of a neurological intensive care patient to stop the deadliest form of stroke, an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). They say this is important because the person is often sedated, sometimes on a ventilator and cannot communicate.

Doctors Matthew Flaherty, Opeolu Adeoye, George Shaw and Joe Clark became frustrated that CT and MRI scans were the only option and couldn't be done repeatedly. Shaw tells the story.

After a battery of tests, doctors at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center say Otto Warmbier, recently released from a North Korean prison, is in a state of unresponsive wakefulness, meaning he shows no signs of understanding his surroundings and he has not spoken.

Two days after Wyoming High School graduate Otto Warmbier landed in Cincinnati on a medically equipped plane from North Korea, his father spoke to the media.

Fred Warmbier says he is feeling "relief now that  Otto is home in the arms of those who love him, and anger that he was so brutally treated for so long."

Update: A small group of supporters came to Lunken Airport Tuesday night carrying signs saying, "Welcome Home Otto."

Most were family friends who say they feel terrible that the Wyoming High School grad was reportedly beaten while jailed in North Korea and has been in a coma for over a year.

Otto Warmbier's plane, a Gulfstream flying in from Alaska, landed at Lunken about 10:10 p.m. It taxied to the terminal and a couple of people carried Warmbier off the plane and into an ambulance headed for the University of Cincinnati Medical Center.

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Airlines, hotels and cruise ships are increasingly personalizing your vacation by collecting personal data and tech experts like Dave Hatter are tempted but leery.

The owner of a well known Hamilton County landscaping company is facing indictment after allegedly setting up a front company to win $2 million worth of minority contracts from the City of Cincinnati. 

Doug Evans and his vice president of operations Jim Bailey could be sentenced to more than 100 years in prison if convicted on all counts. U.S. Attorney Ben Glassman says between 2008 and 2014 the front company, Ergon LLC, applied for and received more than 100 contracts for demolition and site construction.

People continue to dump non-recyclable items at recycling sites in Adams and Clermont counties forcing the shutdown of the fourth location.

U.S. doctors are slowly turning to digital pathology to more accurately diagnose and treat cancer.

In April 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved digital microscopes for use in primary cancer diagnosis. This is the process of scanning conventional glass slides to create a virtual image. That image can be easily transferred anyplace in the world for a second opinion. Complete with a computer algorithm, the machine can also see patterns a pathologist may not be able to pick out.

Redevelopment of the Warren County fairgrounds is in full swing.

Covington is resurrecting its litter and graffiti removal program as the city continues to attract new development.

Beginning June 5, crews will concentrate on Rivercenter Boulevard  south to Seventh Street and Madison, Scott and Greenup south to Fifth. Since August, 80 oversized round and square planters have popped up along Madison Avenue between Fourth and Seventh Streets sprouting bright colored flowers.

The Warren County Sheriff's Department wants a drug dealer it recently arrested to face involuntary manslaughter charges after one of his users died.

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