Ann Thompson

With more than 20 years of journalism experience in the Greater Cincinnati market, Ann Thompson brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise to her reporting. She has reported for WKRC, WCKY, WHIO-TV, Metro Networks and CBS/ABC Radio. Her work has been recognized by the Associated Press and the Society of Professional Journalists. In 2011 A-P named her “Best Reporter” for large market radio in Ohio. She has won awards from the Association of Women in Communications and the Alliance for Women in Media. Ann reports regularly on science and technology in Focus on Technology.

She has reported from India, Japan, South Korea, Germany and Belgium as part of fellowships from the East-West Center and RIAS.

Thousands of people celebrated the life of an American college student who was detained in North Korea for over a year and died shortly after being returned to Ohio. 

It appears we might never know the exact cause of death for Otto Warmbier, a Wyoming High School grad held in North Korea for 17 months for allegedly stealing a propaganda poster.

Update June 20, noon: A public funeral service for Otto Warmbier is scheduled for Thursday June 22 at Wyoming High School at 9:00 a.m.

Burial will be at Oak Hills Cemetery, according to Spring Grove which owns that cemetery.

UC researchers have figured out a way to non-invasively peek inside the brain of a neurological intensive care patient to stop the deadliest form of stroke, an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). They say this is important because the person is often sedated, sometimes on a ventilator and cannot communicate.

Doctors Matthew Flaherty, Opeolu Adeoye, George Shaw and Joe Clark became frustrated that CT and MRI scans were the only option and couldn't be done repeatedly. Shaw tells the story.

After a battery of tests, doctors at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center say Otto Warmbier, recently released from a North Korean prison, is in a state of unresponsive wakefulness, meaning he shows no signs of understanding his surroundings and he has not spoken.

Two days after Wyoming High School graduate Otto Warmbier landed in Cincinnati on a medically equipped plane from North Korea, his father spoke to the media.

Fred Warmbier says he is feeling "relief now that  Otto is home in the arms of those who love him, and anger that he was so brutally treated for so long."

Update: A small group of supporters came to Lunken Airport Tuesday night carrying signs saying, "Welcome Home Otto."

Most were family friends who say they feel terrible that the Wyoming High School grad was reportedly beaten while jailed in North Korea and has been in a coma for over a year.

Otto Warmbier's plane, a Gulfstream flying in from Alaska, landed at Lunken about 10:10 p.m. It taxied to the terminal and a couple of people carried Warmbier off the plane and into an ambulance headed for the University of Cincinnati Medical Center.

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Airlines, hotels and cruise ships are increasingly personalizing your vacation by collecting personal data and tech experts like Dave Hatter are tempted but leery.

The owner of a well known Hamilton County landscaping company is facing indictment after allegedly setting up a front company to win $2 million worth of minority contracts from the City of Cincinnati. 

Doug Evans and his vice president of operations Jim Bailey could be sentenced to more than 100 years in prison if convicted on all counts. U.S. Attorney Ben Glassman says between 2008 and 2014 the front company, Ergon LLC, applied for and received more than 100 contracts for demolition and site construction.

People continue to dump non-recyclable items at recycling sites in Adams and Clermont counties forcing the shutdown of the fourth location.

U.S. doctors are slowly turning to digital pathology to more accurately diagnose and treat cancer.

In April 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved digital microscopes for use in primary cancer diagnosis. This is the process of scanning conventional glass slides to create a virtual image. That image can be easily transferred anyplace in the world for a second opinion. Complete with a computer algorithm, the machine can also see patterns a pathologist may not be able to pick out.

Redevelopment of the Warren County fairgrounds is in full swing.

Covington is resurrecting its litter and graffiti removal program as the city continues to attract new development.

Beginning June 5, crews will concentrate on Rivercenter Boulevard  south to Seventh Street and Madison, Scott and Greenup south to Fifth. Since August, 80 oversized round and square planters have popped up along Madison Avenue between Fourth and Seventh Streets sprouting bright colored flowers.

The Warren County Sheriff's Department wants a drug dealer it recently arrested to face involuntary manslaughter charges after one of his users died.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

At the Springfield Beckley Municipal Airport, crews will begin installing a new kind of radar in June that will allow air traffic controllers to see a combination of planes and unmanned aerial vehicles The Air Force and the state of Ohio are footing the $5 million radar bill in first-of-its-kind testing that both parties hope will lead to Federal Aviation Administration approval for "beyond line of sight" flight.

At the Springfield Beckley Municipal Airport crews will begin installing a new kind of radar in June that will allow air traffic controllers to see a combination of planes and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The Air Force and the State of Ohio are footing the $5 million radar bill in first-of-its-kind testing that both parties hope will lead to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approval for beyond line of sight flight.

A study is underway in Kentucky surveying the state's aerospace industry and determining the direction for the future. The state is No. 2 in the nation in aerospace exports, behind only the State of Washington.

A Cincinnati barge company was the backdrop for an announcement of sweeping changes to the agricultural industry. In front of an Ohio River barge filled with soybeans for likely shipment to southeast Asia, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue detailed the department's overhaul including the creation of an Undersecretary for Trade and Foreign Agricultural Affairs.

In the next decade you may be flying on a tiny battery operated plane for as little as $25 to a destination you might have otherwise driven.

Start-up Zunum Aero is building a fleet of hybrid-electric planes to handle those short flights with financial backers such as Boeing Horizon X and JetBlue Technology Ventures.

With heavy rain predicted this weekend, crews are putting tarps over a Mt. Adams landslide that has already damaged two homes and a tavern.

The government has released a new report about conditions at the Cincinnati VA Medical Center and its Ft. Thomas hospice care.

Right now car companies are focused on  making sure self-driving vehicles can safely navigate the road. But when all the kinks get worked out they'll turn their attention to the car's interior to best suit drivers who don't have to drive.

The Newport Southbank Bridge Company is looking to make a splash with a new and improved Purple People Bridge. Plans include repainting it, adding LED lighting, a "love lock" area, and reinforced flooring for the railroad side of the bridge.

Researchers in Europe and philanthropists in New York are singing the praises Tuesday of a new malaria test from Newtown-based Meridian Bioscience on this World Malaria Day.

A Milford company is back with an updated communication tool for ALS and other "locked-in" patients.

Known for the NeuroSwitch, Control Bionics has shrunk the technology and made it wearable. The new product is NeuroNode.

Lunken Airport Manager Fred Anderton says after a decade of relative quiet on the economic development front the City of Cincinnati is getting requests to build corporate facilities and even private storage hangars there.

The problem Anderton faces is lack of land. The airport is surrounded by two rivers, has railroad tracks to the west and a state highway to the north. He says, "We've got to develop some areas that we can place those facilities."

Scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital and Ben Gurion University have developed a prototype device designed to quickly and accurately locate a vein or artery in children and adults in need of a medical procedure. It uses ultrasound and a robotic arm.

FIND, or Fast Intelligent Needle Delivery, is the invention of the newly formed company, Xact Medical and an ongoing partnership with Ben Gurion.

Cincinnati Police detectives are calling on the public for clues into a rash of graffiti incidents in Clifton's Gaslight District.

Just like the drug problem, the Hamilton County Heroin Coalition continues to grow.

The group welcomed two more representatives to its regular meeting Friday, The Health Collaborative, representing hospitals, and the Amos Project, representing the faith community.

Cincinnati is a great place to find a green job, according to the personal finance website GoodCall. A new report lists the Queen City as number two nationally.  Michelle Billick cites job availability, salary, and the city's affordability.

"A lot of the positions such as technicians, all environmentally focused, project managers, educators, engineers," Billick says. "There is a environmental firm office in Cincinnati CH2M  and that brings in a lot of  environmentally focused positions."

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