Anjelica A. Morrison

Angelica A. Morrison is a multimedia journalist with over a decade of experience in the field.

Angelica joined the WBFO-FM staff in April 2016 as the station’s Great Lakes Regional Journalism Collaborative reporter/project coordinator (RJC). The Great Lakes RJC covers a variety of issues, including environmental, economic and lifestyle, along the Great Lakes corridor.

Born and bred in upstate New York, Angelica has a passion for New York State and its inhabitants. As a child she lived in rural Rochester with corn fields and cows for neighbors, then moved to a more urban environment on Buffalo’s west side and then back to Rochester (this time as a city dweller). Angelica’s interest in journalism began to sprout in high school when she toured her hometown newspaper the Democrat and Chronicle.

Her adventures in journalism have taken her across the state. After graduating from Buffalo State College, she worked as a reporter for the Lockport Union Sun and Journal, then as a freelance writer for The Buffalo News.

Angelica then trekked across the state to Utica, New York where she worked for several years as a multimedia journalist and web producer for the Observer-Dispatch and then served as a news producer/web producer for the NBC affiliate WKTV News Channel 2.

Angelica returned to Buffalo in the spring of 2014. She reintroduced herself to the public as a freelance journalist for The Buffalo News and The Niagara Gazette.

Angelica’s interests include gardening, eating, shopping, Internet binge watching (mostly Happy Days and Three’s Company on YouTube), knitting, politics, Adirondack camping, finance (researching ways to become a millionaire), loose leaf tea, Star Trek, Marvel Comics, buying local honey (along with other locally grown foods and produce), several gym memberships, free slushy day at 7-Eleven, flying kites, reading (or collecting books with the intention of reading them) and Groupon.

NIAGARA FALLS, NY - An environmental alert was issued by the New York State Alert system early Wednesday morning advising residents of a sewer discharge in the Niagara River near the popular American Falls.

According to the alert system an estimated 1.1 million gallons of untreated sewage was released into the water. The release was caused by overcapacity issues that resulted from yesterday's heavy rains. Representatives at the Niagara Falls Wastewater Treatment Plant were not available to comment.

More than 150 years ago, the Great Lakes region played a key role in the Underground Railroad. Runaway slaves made their way to cities along the lakes and crossed the border to freedom in Canada. Fast forward to today, when thousands of asylum seekers are passing up a chance to live in the U-S – and are heading north too.


Updated Wednesday, Aug. 3

The recent black, odorous wastewater discharge near the base of Niagara Falls violated New York regulations, a state official says. But it's unclear whether any fines will result.


Maid of the Mist Capt. Rod MacDonald has been ferrying tourists at Niagara Falls for nearly three decades. Take a look inside the wheelhouse.

Invasive fish and plants that have plagued the Great Lakes region for decades are getting some special attention this week.


A new series of environmental events focused on clearing invasive plants will begin this summer in the Buffalo area.

The Buffalo Niagara Riverkeeper and Labatt USA are hosting several cleanup events centered around Times Beach on Lake Erie and Seneca Bluffs on the Buffalo River. The river empties into the eastern end of Lake Erie.

In addition to clearing debris, volunteers will help remove invasives, Riverkeeper Executive Director Jill Jedlicka says.

The National Wildlife Federation issued a statement in response to the recent discovery of an Asian Carp found just a few miles outside of Lake Michigan.

Angelica A. Morrison reports

The issue of clean water was at the forefront of a demonstration Friday morning in downtown Buffalo.


A new report on the health of the Great Lakes is out this week, and it shows a grim outlook for Lake Erie.


Final part of a series on President Trump's budget

On the shores of the lower Niagara River, about 10 miles from Niagara Falls, a group of biologists from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service prepare to examine the largest fish species in the Great Lakes region – the lake sturgeon.


Biologists with the USFWS work to monitor and track the progress of the Lake Sturgeon in the lower Niagara River.

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The comeback of the American bald eagle is a success story across the Great Lakes region, and keeping them safe is a high priority for many environmental professionals. But one serious threat to the great raptor is lead poisoning.