Anjelica A. Morrison

Angelica A. Morrison is a multimedia journalist with over a decade of experience in the field.

Angelica joined the WBFO-FM staff in April 2016 as the station's Great Lakes Regional Journalism Collaborative reporter/project coordinator (RJC). The Great Lakes RJC covers a variety of issues, including environmental, economic and lifestyle, along the Great Lakes corridor.

Born and bred in upstate New York, Angelica has a passion for New York State and its inhabitants. As a child she lived in rural Rochester with corn fields and cows for neighbors, then moved to a more urban environment on Buffalo's west side and then back to Rochester (this time as a city dweller). Angelica's interest in journalism began to sprout in high school when she toured her hometown newspaper the Democrat and Chronicle.

Her adventures in journalism have taken her across the state. After graduating from Buffalo State College, she worked as a reporter for the Lockport Union Sun and Journal, then as a freelance writer for The Buffalo News.

Angelica then trekked across the state to Utica, New York where she worked for several years as a multimedia journalist and web producer for the Observer-Dispatch and then served as a news producer/web producer for the NBC affiliate WKTV News Channel 2.

Angelica returned to Buffalo in the spring of 2014. She reintroduced herself to the public as a freelance journalist for The Buffalo News and The Niagara Gazette.

Angelica's interests include gardening, eating, shopping, Internet binge watching (mostly Happy Days and Three's Company on YouTube), knitting, politics, Adirondack camping, finance (researching ways to become a millionaire), loose leaf tea, Star Trek, Marvel Comics, buying local honey (along with other locally grown foods and produce), several gym memberships, free slushy day at 7-Eleven, flying kites, reading (or collecting books with the intention of reading them) and Groupon.

First of three parts

Reports on climate change often highlight the impact to America's coastal cities. But plants, crops and trees are also at risk -- and the harm can spread well beyond field and forest.


There’s some bad news in the Great Lakes and it’s all about the sea lamprey, an eel-like creature that literally sucks the life out of fish. They do a lot of damage and now they’re on the rise in some lakes.

That trend has stumped scientists.


Matthew Child, a scientist with the International Joint Commission, talks with Great Lakes Today's Angelica Morrison about the transporting oil throughout the Great Lakes region.

It’s day two of the Great Lakes Restoration Conference in Buffalo New York. Hundreds  are learning about problems that affect the lakes, including microplastics.


The ethanol mandate was among the topics of discussion at the Healing Our Waters Great Lakes Restoration Conference in Buffalo, N.Y.

Agriculture Policy Analyst for the National Wildlife Federation David DeGennaro discusses the issue as it relates to the Great Lake region.

The Healing Our Waters Great Lakes Restoration Conference is under way this week, bringing attention to critical Great Lakes issues.


Niagara Falls, N.Y., has a messy problem -- it continues to dump sewage and discolored water downriver from the popular tourist attraction. The most recent incident happened Wednesday afternoon.


Several states, including a few in the Great Lakes region, have received a sizable chunk of money from the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities. The funding is to increase protections in watershed areas.


The Great Lakes region serves as a major flyway for a variety of migratory birds.

A small island in the Niagara River has received a makeover, thanks to the New York State Power Authority and the state Department of Environmental Conservation.Angelica A. Morrison reports.

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