Andy Chow

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission’s Fellowship program as a production assistant for “The Ohio Channel.”

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

Rally at the Statehouse to save Medicaid expansion from proposed enrollment freeze.
Dan Konik / Ohio Public Radio

Hundreds of advocates gathered on the steps of the Statehouse to rally against a vote that would freeze Medicaid enrollment for certain people next year. This could be a last minute push as the House considers taking that up tomorrow.

Hundreds of advocates gathered on the steps of the Statehouse to rally against a vote that would freeze Medicaid enrollment for certain people next year. This could be a last minute push as the House considers taking that up tomorrow.

Concealed carry
Flickr / Creative Commons

State lawmakers are considering a bill that would allow people who carry concealed weapons into gun-free zones to avoid criminal charges.

State lawmakers are considering a bill that would allow people to carry concealed weapons into gun-free zones without being criminally liable.

The Republican-sponsored bill would let concealed-carry permit holders take their guns into gun-free zones including restaurants, schools and courthouses as long as they’re not caught. If they are caught and if they leave immediately, they won't face criminal charges.

State lawmakers are considering a bill that would allow people to carry concealed weapons into gun free zones without being criminally liable. 

Lawmakers are about to take a long break after spending the last five months on the $65 billion budget. Leaders are already looking at what could be the next big issue in the House and Senate.

Ohio Auditor Dave Yost
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

The state auditor is looking into filing a restraining order against the largest online charter school district in Ohio, which is already facing a $60 million bill from the state for inflating its enrollment figures.

The state auditor is looking into filing a restraining order against the largest online charter school district in Ohio, which is already facing a $60 million bill from the state for inflating its enrollment figures. Auditor Dave Yost is trying to get the Electronic Classroom Of Tomorrow, or ECOT, to stop using taxpayer money for politically-motivated ads. 

Ohio Statehouse Legislative Chamber
Bob Hall / Flickr

The clock is ticking for Gov. John Kasich who has until Friday night to sign the $65 billion state budget that fills a revenue shortfall and makes some major policy changes. At least one of those changes that could set the stage for a veto fight. 

The clock is ticking for Gov. John Kasich who has until Friday night to sign the $65 billion state budget that not only fills a revenue shortfall but makes some major policy changes. And there’s at least one change that could set the stage for a veto fight. 

Leaders in the House and Senate are on the brink of approving a provision that would allow power companies to add another fee to your electric bill. The idea is to boost the utilities’ credit ratings. 

Democrats have yet to announce their candidacy for state treasurer and auditor. Two are now reportedly considering them, including a former candidate for Cincinnati mayor. 

State lawmakers are trying to hash out a final budget deal that they can send to the governor’s desk. This includes how they’ll spend money to fight the opioid epidemic while closing a more than $1 billion budget hole. But there’s a big issue that looms over the discussion.

Ohio House Minority Leader Fred Strahorn
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

Democratic leaders in the state are making one last push to change some provisions they’re most concerned about in the state budget bill.

House Minority Leader Fred Strahorn of Dayton says the Senate budget makes too many cuts at a time when more money needs to be invested in schools, infrastructure and fighting the opioid epidemic.

Democratic leaders in the state are making one last push to change some provisions they’re most concerned about in the state budget bill. 

It’s now up to legislative leaders to come together and knock out a final budget agreement with just a little over a week before the fiscal year ends. The Senate debated its version for hours before passing it.

It’s now up to legislative leaders to come together and knock out a final budget agreement with just a little over a week before the fiscal year ends. Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports the Senate debated its version for hours before passing it. 

Columbus City Schools

The ACLU of Ohio is standing up for a Columbus City School employee who posted hateful comments against LGBTQ people and the city’s Pride Festival.

As the U.S. Senate prepares to unveil its health care plan, the Ohio Senate is moving with a provision that would stop enrolling a certain group of people into Medicaid. 

The ACLU of Ohio is standing up for a Columbus City School employee who posted hateful comments against LGBTQ people and the city’s Pride Festival. 

The U.S. Supreme Court has decided to not hear an argument from an Ohio group that claims the state’s top elections official is wrongfully tossing out ballots. 

Dan Konik

The Senate is planning to vote on its version of the budget in the next week, and the possibility of last minute changes means there are a lot of moving parts where no provision is safe. The top Senate leader has at least one measure he knows he wants to pass one way or another.

Lawmakers and the Kasich administration have gone back and forth on a budget issue that would change the way people with long term health problems would receive medical care. That provision is still on the table as the Senate works to craft their final draft of the budget bill.

Coal plants are struggling to make a profit in Ohio. And there have been proposals from regulators and lawmakers that would help prop up those plants by passing additional costs on to customers. However, legislators say their latest plan would help a struggling plant that was created under unusual circumstances that go back 60 years. 

Local government leaders believe municipalities are taking some big hits in the latest state budget proposal. Those advocates say this could create a domino effect for cities and towns around the state.

National and local leaders are voicing their support for the victims of a shooting that took place during baseball practice among members of Congress and staff in Washington DC this morning. 

Local leaders are urging state lawmakers to save Ohio’s nuclear plants in fear of the impact those shutdowns would have on their communities. 

Wind turbines in Blue Creek Township in Paulding County, Ohio.
Nyttend / Wikimedia Commons

Several Ohio cities, colleges and universities are joining a nationwide alliance to create a show of force that they’re dedicated to fighting climate change.

The effort comes just days after President Trump announced plans for the U.S. to leave the Paris Climate Agreement.

Several Ohio cities, colleges and universities are joining a nationwide alliance to create a show of force to the country that they’re dedicated to fighting climate change. The effort comes just days after the U.S. announced plans to leave the Paris Climate Agreement. But the alliance in Ohio seems to stop at the local level.

Farm field in Union County, Ohio.
DAN KONIK / Ohio Public Radio

Farmers all around Ohio are turning to lawmakers to help fix what they see as a major crisis. Taxes on their land have been soaring. But making a change to the tax formula could do some damage to a different industry.

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