Andy Chow

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission’s Fellowship program as a production assistant for “The Ohio Channel.”

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

The highest ranking Democrat in Ohio is calling for a new approach in the conversation about the federal health care law. U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown wants to start over with a different approach.

A Republican candidate for governor believes the momentum is swinging his direction after gaining more support from local leaders. These endorsements have proven to be helpful in recent big elections.

State investigators are continuing to examine the Ohio State Fair ride that broke apart, killing one person and leaving seven others injured. Gov. John Kasich isn’t ruling out the possibility that this may have been an unavoidable accident.

The air was full of the typical sounds of the Ohio State Fair, except for the eerie absence of the rides as they stood still. All rides are shut down as the State Highway Patrol carries out its investigation into the “Fire Ball” a giant pendulum that swings riders up to 40 feet into the air.

State investigators are continuing to examine the Ohio State Fair ride that broke apart, killing one person and leaving several others seriously injured. Gov. John Kasich isn’t ruling out the possibility that this may have been an unavoidable accident.

The state of Ohio executed its first death row inmate in more than three years today (Wednesday). Ronald  Phillips of Akron was sentenced to die 23 years ago, and the latest 3 ½ year delay in his execution and others followed a legal battle triggered by a questionable lethal injection in 2014. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, this execution seemed to have a very different result.

The state of Ohio executed its first death row inmate in more than three years today (Wednesday) after a questionable lethal injection in 2014 sparked a long legal battle over how the state carries out the death penalty. This execution seemed to have a very different result.

A Republican challenging a top state leader for the U.S. Senate nomination is throwing his first big swing with a six-figure ad buy. 

Ohio’s top elections official has sent the state’s database of voter information to the White House’s commission on election integrity. But the report left out sensitive data.

Ohio Auditor Dave Yost
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state auditor wants the Ohio Department of Education to stop paying so much public money to the state's largest online charter school. He claims there are still discrepancies as to how many students are actually attending the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow.

The state auditor wants the education department to stop paying so much money to an embattled online charter school. He claims there are still discrepancies as to how many students are actually attending ECOT. 

solar panels
Pixabay

A couple of large wind farms have cropped up in Ohio over the past couple of years, but the state still hasn’t seen a big development with solar power. That could change very soon with not one but three big solar farms in the works.

Changes are under way for how much time a person might spend in prison for a non-violent crime. The reforms of Ohio's criminal justice system will cut down on prison time in exchange for more community-based rehabilitation. Supporters believe they will not only save the state money but improve community safety.

A couple of large wind farms have cropped up in Ohio over the past couple of years, but the state still hasn’t seen a big development with solar power. That could change very soon with not one but three big solar farms in the works.

Changes are under way for how much time a person might spend in prison for a non-violent crime. These criminal justice reforms will cut down on prison time in exchange for more community based rehabilitation. Supporters believe this will not only save the state money but improve community safety.

At least three big school districts are pleading with state education officials to take a close look at what they think is a major discrepancy. This has to do with the tests given to see if a third grader can advance to the next level in reading. 

Ohio Supreme Court
Flickr / Creative Commons

The state Department of Education can start collecting $60 million from Ohio’s largest online charter school. This comes after the Ohio Supreme Court decided not to grant an injunction. However, the fight is far from over.

The state department of education can start collecting $60 million from Ohio’s largest online charter school. This comes after the Ohio Supreme Court decided not to grant an injunction. However, the fight is far from over.

mammography cancer breast screening equipment
ZLIKOVEC / SHUTTERSTOCK

Lawmakers and health care providers are praising a change in Ohio law that expands access to breast and cervical cancer screenings to hundreds of thousands of people.

Lawmakers and health care providers are praising a change in Ohio law that expands access to breast and cervical cancer screenings to hundreds of thousands of people. 

State Auditor Dave Yost has recently become a vocal critic of the state’s largest online charter school. But one lawmaker thinks Yost should recuse himself from any further investigations into the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow.

State Auditor Dave Yost has recently become a vocal critic of the state’s largest online charter school. But one lawmaker thinks Yost should recuse himself from any further investigations into the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow. 

Statehouse flowers
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Oil and gas companies could be one step closer to drilling on state-owned land after the House overrode a veto by Gov. John Kasich.

Oil and gas companies could be one step closer to drilling on state-owned land after the House overrode a veto by Gov. John Kasich. 

Ohio’s Republican-dominated Legislature went six years without seriously threatening to override a veto from Gov. John Kasich. Today the House overrode not one, but 11 Kasich vetoes.

The veto overrides moved swiftly through the House with one item after another item getting overturned.

Ohio’s Republican-dominated House and Senate went six years without even a serious threat of overriding a veto from Gov. John Kasich. Today the House overrode not one but 11 Kasich vetoes. 

A bill that would allow licensed permit holders to carry concealed weapons into gun-free zones unless they’re asked to leave is on its way to the Senate after passing the House. 

A bill that would allow licensed permit holders to carry concealed weapons into gun-free zones is on its way to the Senate after passing the House. 

Republican Rep. John Becker says the bill would help people who mistakenly carry a gun into the wrong place.

Under the measure, a concealed-carry permit holder can take a gun into a gun-free zone. They’re not breaking the law until someone notices the weapon and asks them to leave.

Rally at the Statehouse to save Medicaid expansion from proposed enrollment freeze.
Dan Konik / Ohio Public Radio

Hundreds of advocates gathered on the steps of the Statehouse to rally against a vote that would freeze Medicaid enrollment for certain people next year. This could be a last minute push as the House considers taking that up tomorrow.

Hundreds of advocates gathered on the steps of the Statehouse to rally against a vote that would freeze Medicaid enrollment for certain people next year. This could be a last minute push as the House considers taking that up tomorrow.

Concealed carry
Flickr / Creative Commons

State lawmakers are considering a bill that would allow people who carry concealed weapons into gun-free zones to avoid criminal charges.

Pages