NPR News Headlines

Legal wrangling between the Trump Administration and House Republicans leaves $7 billion of Obamacare subsidies in question. That has health insurance executives reaching for antacid, because it means they may have to jack up premiums. They have to assume that fewer people will buy health insurance if they don’t get subsidies to pay for it, and that means price increases for everyone left on the individual market. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

GettyImages-654199022.jpg
JaeRan Kim

The White House’s budget mirrors initial proposals to cut funding for the Environmental Protection Agency by about 30 percent. While the budget still faces negotiations in Congress, the agency seems to be preparing for major reductions, including staff.  The agency announced last week it’s setting aside $12 million for buyouts and early retirements. EPA employees who feel unsure about their future with the agency have been seeking other options, and there are employers who want to give them jobs.

A rare outbreak of botulism has hospitalized nine people and killed one man in northern California, health officials say.

The outbreak began early last month when several people fell ill after eating nacho cheese sauce bought at a gas station in Walnut Grove, Calif., just outside Sacramento.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

President Trump's full budget proposal for fiscal year 2018, to be released Tuesday, calls for a $9.2 billion, or 13.5 percent, spending cut to education. The cuts would be spread across K-12 and aid to higher education, according to documents released by the White House.

None of this can be finalized without Congress. And the political track record for Presidents who want to reduce education funding is not promising, even in a far less poisoned atmosphere than the one that hovers over Washington right now.

Student loans

The Trump administration says it can balance the federal budget within a decade. Its blueprint calls for significant cuts to social safety net programs and assumes more robust economic growth.

The administration plans to release what it calls a "Taxpayer First" budget on Tuesday.

"This is, I think, the first time in a long time that an administration has written a budget through the eyes of the people who are actually paying the taxes," White House Budget Director Mick Mulvaney told reporters on Monday.

President Trump asked two top U.S. intelligence chiefs to push back against the FBI's investigation into possible collusion between Russia and his presidential campaign, the Washington Post reported Monday evening.

Conrad Balliet reads Jane Kretschman's poem, "Death Is Embarrassing"


Copyright 2017 WYSO-FM. To see more, visit WYSO-FM.

Updated at 4:30 a.m. ET

Police in Manchester, England, confirm 22 people dead at Manchester Arena following an explosion after a concert by Ariana Grande. Nearly 60 people have been injured.

Authorities say they believe one man detonated an improvised explosive device, and was killed in the explosion. Chief Constable Ian Hopkins of the Greater Manchester Police said in a news conference,

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This year marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of the man who invented recorded sound — Edouard-Leon Scott de Martinville. He beat the more well-known inventor Thomas Edison by 20 years, though his accomplishments were only recognized over the last decade.

While the uses of recorded sound seem obvious now — music, news, voice messages — none of it was obvious to Scott or Edison when they made the first recordings. It's a story that has some lessons for today's aspiring inventors.

A diplomatic dispute deepened when Turkey summoned the American ambassador in Ankara to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Monday, to protest "the aggressive and unprofessional actions taken" by American security personnel against Turkish security officers.

Updated at 10:08 p.m. ET.

The Office of Government Ethics has rejected a White House attempt to block the agency's compilation of federal ethics rules waivers granted to officials hired into the Trump administration from corporations and lobbying firms.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is narrowing the scope of an executive order on so-called sanctuary cities.

A federal judge in California last month blocked a key part of that order, reasoning that the Trump administration had overstepped by threatening to yank federal money from those places.

A Mississippi lawmaker apologized Monday for saying the Louisiana leaders who supported the recent removal of four Confederate monuments "should be LYNCHED!" Karl Oliver, a GOP state representative, had made the comment in a Facebook post this weekend.

Here is the original statement:

Republican legislation to dismantle the Affordable Care Act is on its way to the Senate.

Giving new moms face-to-face education about safe sleep practices — and providing them with a cardboard "baby box" where their newborns can sleep right when they get home — reduces the incidence of bed sharing, a significant risk factor for SIDS and other unexpected sleep-related deaths, a study from Temple University in Philadelphia has found.

The Big Oops: Blunders Large and Small

17 hours ago
Hasan Minhaj
Photo by Christian Leonard

Jessica Lee Williamson works on a routine for her school talent show.

Hasan Minhaj misses his mom when she moves back to India to attend school.

Holly Rutter does some late night grocery shopping.

Bob Zellner is curious about a movement rising in Montgomery, Alabama in the early 1960's. 

Three vacant houses in Cleveland’s Slavic Village are now full of art.

This weekend, dozens of local artists created 100 paintings, sculptures, and installations in homes slated for demolition. The event, called “Rooms to Let,” is in its fourth year.

Painter Scott Pickering said the event is helping to revive the neighborhood by filling it with people and art, even if the art is temporary.


Next year’s graduating high school senior must get a good score over seven different final tests or on a college entrance exam, or earn an industry credential. As many as 47,000 high school juniors are potentially on track to fail to meet those standards. An amendment that may be attached to the budget in the Senate seeks to help those students.

State senators are considering a proposal to move more of Ohio’s Medicaid population into managed care. And a new study from a group representing health insurance companies in Ohio shows that managed health care for certain people saves money and proves to be more effective. 

Nicky Hayden, a champion motorcycle racer, died at an Italian hospital Monday, five days after being struck by a car while bicycling as part of his training on the Rimini coast.

The 35-year-old had suffered trauma to his head, chest and abdomen after colliding with the car's windshield, leaving him in critical condition at Maurizio Bufalino Hospital in Cesena.

The hospital confirmed Monday that he died "following a very serious polytrauma."

Picture a kaleidoscope of color and a medley of vivid African print cloth surging forward amid screams and weeping — for joy.

That was the magnificent and moving scene, Saturday, in the Nigerian capital, Abuja, as 82 former Chibok schoolgirls — now young women — were reunited with their mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles and other family members, after three years in Boko Haram captivity. Tears were streaming down their faces and gave way to broad smiles of happiness and relief after years of torment and trauma and missing their families.

One in eight Americans — 42 million people — still struggles to get enough to eat. And while that number has been going down recently, hunger appears to be getting worse in some economically distressed areas, especially in rural communities.

Food banks that serve these areas are also feeling the squeeze, as surplus food supplies dwindle but the lines of people seeking help remain long.

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly has extended for six months a program that has allowed tens of thousands of Haitians to remain in the U.S. following the 2010 earthquake in Haiti.

But Trump administration officials say they believe conditions are improving on the Caribbean island and that Haitians should make plans to return to their home country.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The ransomware attack on worldwide computer networks earlier this month largely spared those of the federal government. While the government dodged a bullet this time, experts say, its systems are still vulnerable — although perhaps less so than in the past.

When the global malware attack — dubbed "WannaCry" — was first detected, a government cybersecurity response group moved quickly.

Building a better battery is the holy grail for people who want better technology. Now researchers at the University of Texas, Austin say they may have found that battery — or something close. But their claims have sparked controversy.

At the center of this debate is a towering figure in the world of science — John Goodenough, who teaches material science at the university.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Pages