NPR News Headlines

At a rally in Alabama on Friday night, President Trump expressed his opinion that NFL players who kneel or otherwise take part in protests during the national anthem prior to games should be fired.

Officials with Dayton-based health insurance company CareSource are speaking out against a proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act. The company’s president has added her name to a letter opposing the Republican-backed bill known as Graham-Cassidy.

Nonprofit CareSource is one of the largest Medicaid providers in the country, and in the state of Ohio.

Republican state legislative leaders say they’re putting together a bipartisan group to come up with a new way to draw Congressional districts. This comes as a citizens’ group frustrated with inaction on the issue is planning its own proposal to present to voters.

Insurers Restrict Access To Pricey, Less Addictive Painkillers

1 hour ago

This story was co-published with The New York Times.

At a time when the United States is in the grip of an opioid epidemic, many insurers are limiting access to pain medications that carry a lower risk of addiction or dependence, even as they provide comparatively easy access to generic opioid medications.

For the first time, a female Marine has completed the grueling Infantry Officer Course.

The 13-week course is considered one of the toughest in the U.S. military, and one-third of the class dropped out before graduation.

Antioch University Professor Emeritus Jim Malarkey, says, "The Vietnam War was a defining time in the lives of several generations of Americans and South East Asians. Three million perished and countless were wounded and displaced. The consequences were incalculable. Active resistance to the war eventually led to U.S. withdrawal. But attitudes to the Vietnam war had divided families, towns, campuses and congregations; and the war still sits heavily and unresolved in the minds of many."

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Satya Nadella's new book is called Hit Refresh (like when you reload a webpage). And in it, the CEO of Microsoft doesn't focus on the remarkable story of his climb from middle-class kid in India to head of an American tech giant. Instead, he explores at length a feeling he's working to cultivate in himself: empathy.

It doesn't come as a surprise to people that big names like Facebook, Google, Apple and Amazon are among the five or 10 most valuable companies on earth. But the fact that Microsoft is also on that shortlist surprises people.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

David Litt was 24 years old and just a few years out of college when he landed a job writing speeches for President Barack Obama — an experience he calls "surreal and completely terrifying."

Though he was initially assigned the speeches no one else wanted to write, Litt eventually became a special assistant to the president and senior presidential speechwriter. His duties included writing jokes for the short comedy routine Obama performed annually at the White House Correspondents' Association Dinners.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

It's the latest in a series of Trump remarks that went viral.

Tom Ashbrook is in Spokane, Washington for On Point’s national listening tour talking with locals about this tough wildfire season and our changing climate.

With the coming of fall and cooler weather, comfort foods are on Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst‘s mind. Kathy brings Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young her takes on their favorites — coq au vin and mashed potatoes — as well as macaroni and cheese and her recipe for summer tomato soup that tastes just as good in fall.

With guest host John Donvan.

A special election for a Senate seat in Alabama is being billed as “Trump vs. Trumpland”.

The race pits two leading Republicans against each other. The president favors Luther Strange, who was appointed to the seat after President Trump tapped then-Senator Jeff Sessions to become U.S. Attorney General. Strange is widely accepted as the GOP establishment pick, and he also has the backing of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Salman Rushdie's American Tale

3 hours ago

With guest host John Donvan.

Salman Rushdie’s 13th novel is something of a departure from his other works. In “The Golden House,” Rushdie keeps the magical realism to a minimum and sets the story in America — specifically, the city he now calls home: New York.

The book takes on contemporary American politics through the story of a wealthy and mysterious immigrant family that finds itself in crisis after decades of living in the Big Apple.

For more, visit http://the1a.org.

Pulling The Plug On Free Speech Week

3 hours ago

With guest host John Donvan.

A controversial event planned for this week at the University of California at Berkeley has been officially called off.

“Free Speech Week” was the brainchild of a conservative student group that invited far-right provocateurs like Steve Bannon and Milo Yiannopoulos to speak on campus. Over the weekend, the four-day event was canceled.

Residents of Iraq's Kurdish region cast their votes today in a controversial independence referendum seen as a way to signal the ethnic minority's desire for self-determination, despite strong opposition from regional and international powers.

The historic poll, which is nonbinding, took place in three northern Kurdish provinces of Iraq, as well as in disputed areas such as the oil-rich city of Kirkuk.

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