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(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … G-20 leaders have been meeting to try and head off a global trade war. We’ll bring you the latest. Then, in India, at least 18 people have been killed in a series of lynchings after a video spread widely via WhatsApp groups. The killings have prompted WhatsApp to take action. We’ll explain what it plans to do and how misinformation is being transmitted widely among those groups. Then, Americans streamed more than 400 billion songs in the first half of this year, a trend that’s upending the way the music industry works.

In the battle over the Supreme Court nomination of Brett Kavanaugh, the usual suspects are lining up in support and opposition. At the grass roots, however, there is one new entry nervously eyeing the Kavanaugh nomination. It is March For Our Lives, started by high school students in Parkland, Fla., after the shooting there, and aimed ultimately at enacting more effective gun regulations.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Between social media, election meddling, privacy concerns and fears of internet addiction, we are at a time when we are re-evaluating the grand bargain that we have made with technology. We've gotten used to trading personal information for tailored ads and letting devices into every part of our lives for convenience. But, as we develop these habits and make these trade-offs, what does it mean for our kids?

Procter & Gamble says it plans to ramp up the number of robots it has to a total of 5,000 in the next five years. It now has 3,000, up from 1,000 in 2013. Managers say the reason for the robotic increase is due to advances in vision and gripping, as well as robots that can work alongside people.

An earlier version of this piece ran in 2016.

"Why are traffic lights red, yellow and green?"

When a child asks you a question like this, you have a few options. You can shut her down with a "Just because." You can explain: "Red is for stop and green is for go." Or, you can turn the question back to her and help her figure out the answer with plenty of encouragement.

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Morning News Brief

3 hours ago

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If you're in the hospital or a doctor's office with a painful problem, you'll likely be asked to rate your pain on a scale of 0 to 10 – with 0 meaning no pain at all and 10 indicating the worst pain you can imagine. But many doctors and nurses say this rating system isn't working and they're trying a new approach.

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