NPR News Headlines

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Jerusalem's mufti Mohammed Hussein has declared an end to recent protests, saying Muslims will again pray inside the Al Aqsa Mosque — rather than outside it — after Israeli police removed the last of the security equipment from the entrance to the holy site.

From Jerusalem, NPR's Daniel Estrin reports:

Mon Dieu! Burgundy Snails Aren't French Anymore

1 hour ago

In a large, sparsely furnished room at a food processing plant in the town of Migennes, in France's Burgundy region, three employees prepare large snails for packaging. They take the snails' flesh, which is cooked separately, and put them into shells of the right size. They reconstitute about a thousand snails an hour, says Romain Chapron, the director of Croque Bourgogne, the company that owns this plant and sells a couple million snails each year.

Kareem Abdul Jabbar is taking his shot helping narrow the opportunity and equity gaps with his Skyhook Foundation and Camp Skyhook. The Los Angeles nonprofit helps public school students in the city access a free, fun, week-long STEM education camp experience in the Angeles National Forest.

You can expect to see red dome hats and yellow jumpsuits in Northeast Ohio this weekend. Fans of the iconic Akron new wave band DEVO have their annual convention at Cleveland’s Beachland Ballroom.

For this week’s Shuffle, DEVO superfan Michael Pilmer talks about the 'DEVOtional' fan convention that he co-founded 17 years ago.  

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Rep. Keith Ellison On Trump And The Media

3 hours ago

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Getting Kids Interested In Poetry

3 hours ago

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Betting that thin is in — and might be the only way forward — Senate Republicans are eyeing a "skinny repeal" that would roll back an unpopular portion of the federal health law. But health policy analysts warn that the idea has been tried before, and with little success.

President Trump's announcement that he wants to ban transgender people from serving in the military could mean a historic reversal in the Pentagon's long-term trend of lowering barriers to service.

Or it could be a speed bump on a course the Defense Department was already following.

The question in Washington following Trump's post on Twitter Wednesday morning was: Which it will be?

Almost no one other than Trump himself had any idea what he intended when he wrote this:

Newt Gingrich, the former Republican speaker of the House, was on NPR's Morning Edition Wednesday interviewed by Rachel Martin.

Gingrich threw out a lot of allegations, including that the Justice Department is "very liberal" and "anti-Trump"; that Robert Mueller, the former FBI director and now special counselor in charge of the Russia investigation, is biased because of donations to Hillary Clinton from people at his law firm; and that Mueller has hired "killers" to take down Trump.

Senator John McCain is diagnosed with brain cancer but still travels to Washington for a health care vote, President Trump continues to publicly demean his own attorney general, Jeff Sessions, Jared Kushner testifies about meetings with Russians, and Sean Spicer is out and Anthony Scaramucci is in.

Like the rest of Congress, neither of Ohio’s senators is quite sure how the repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act is going to take shape. As M.L. Schultze reports, they clearly have differing perspectives on what the final shape should be.

Adding it up

Portman has put his name to an amendment that would provide $100 billion dollars to transition people from Medicaid to private insurance. He also backs more money for opioid treatment, and lengthening the time to end Medicaid expansion from three years to six.

Both of Ohio’s U.S. senators expressed surprise at President Trump’s announcement today that he will bar transgender people from serving in the military. 

Trump made his surprise declaration in a series of Twitter posts, saying the military can’t afford what he claimed are the “tremendous medical costs and disruption” that comes with transgender people.

Democrat Sherrod Brown called that ungrounded.

Akron will bring back six school zone-speed cameras after an Ohio Supreme Court decision this morning. The case challenged a state law that requires police officers must be present -- and other conditions met --when the cameras are used.

The ruling, which affected about 20 Ohio cities, found those restrictions unconstitutional.

But Akron spokeswoman Ellen Lander-Nischt says she expects the legislative attacks on speed cameras will continue.


The state of Ohio executed its first death row inmate in more than three years today (Wednesday). Ronald  Phillips of Akron was sentenced to die 23 years ago, and the latest 3 ½ year delay in his execution and others followed a legal battle triggered by a questionable lethal injection in 2014. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, this execution seemed to have a very different result.

In this installment from our series Just Ask: Talking About Disability, we explore the topic of caregiving. Many people with disabilities in the Miami Valley rely on aides, who help with day-to-day tasks. 

One person was killed and seven others injured, including three critically, Wednesday evening when they were ejected from a ride at the Ohio State Fair.

Video posted online appears to show part of the Fire Ball ride detaching before people drop out of their seats to the ground. Their names have not been released.

Michael Vartorella, who is in charge of inspectors for the state Department of Agriculture which is responsible for safety checks, said the Fire Ball and all the rides had been inspected several times before being certified to operate.

Senate Republicans have at least narrowed the options on what comes next for the Affordable Care Act — casting two separate votes since Tuesday that knocked out a "repeal-only" proposal and rejected a plan for replacement.

So, as lawmakers resume debate on Thursday, they will be staring at basically one possibility: a so-called "skinny repeal" that would surgically remove some key provisions from Obamacare, while leaving the rest intact — at least for now.

Pages