NPR News Headlines

The Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., has generated plenty of controversy since it opened last fall.

But concerns about President Trump's conflicts of interest might not be enough to stop his company from opening a second hotel in the nation's capital.

Muslim children are more likely to be bullied in school than children of other faiths. A new survey by the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding (ISPU) reveals that 42 percent of Muslims with children in K–12 schools report bullying of their children because of their faith, compared with 23 percent of Jewish and 20 percent of Protestant parents.

These results confirm recent findings by other research and advocacy groups showing that bullying of students of color is on the rise.

Dear Mr. President, by Kim Bramlage

February 16, 2017

Dear Mr. President: The Other Side of the Wall

36 minutes ago

Audio documentary

The Other Side of the Wall, by Mark Yungmann

Canyon Mansfield and his dog were walking the ridge line near his house in Pocatello, Idaho, when the 14-year-old spotted a curious device that looked like a sprinkler nestled in the ground.

Dear Mr. President: Kindness And Love

37 minutes ago

Dear Mr. President,

You are about to embark on the most important job in the world and will have the capacity to change our world.

The question is, how would you like to change it? I hope your intention is to change it for the good.

I have learned that one can only give what they have, so if you want to give kindness and love, then you have to have plenty of it in your heart to give.

My suggestion to you is to surround yourself with loving people who will give you advice backed up with love, care and generosity, then you can give them to the world.

A federal judge levied the first of two punishments over the "Bridgegate" tale of political retaliation in New Jersey Wednesday, sentencing former Port Authority Deputy Executive Director Bill Baroni to two years in prison.

-Original music, written and performed by Ohio Heritage Fellow Rick Good

January 17, 2017

 Dear Mr. President asks what you want to say about your community, and what you want President Donald Trump to know about the Miami Valley. Submit your own letter by emailing it to wyso@wyso.org. 

Attention: President Donald Trump

The West side of Dayton, Ohio, is symptomatic or emblematic of the successful politics of racism, whereby it is acceptable to neglect and disparage African American (or Black in the common racial parlance) sides of cities and towns across America. This has resulted in lower property values, a general lack of investments, blighted neighborhoods and communities, lower education standards, fewer job opportunities and exponential growth in urban crime.

Dear Mr. President: Con Man

1 hour ago

Con Man, by Sandy Leigh

January 18, 2017

Dear Mr. President asks what you want to say about your community, and what you want President Donald Trump to know about the Miami Valley. Submit your own letter by emailing it to wyso@wyso.org.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

I was in the mood for reading "lite" this week. It was a nice fleeting thought. Instead, I took a detour because I got curious about Daniel Magariel's slim debut novel, One of the Boys, which is adorned with raves from writers who mostly don't generate such blurbs.

I found myself reading the novel in one still afternoon. A slim, deeply affecting and brutal story, One of the Boys is about the fierce power of a father-son relationship, which, in these pages, all but grinds a young boy to a pulp.

Two anti-abortion activists who covertly recorded themselves discussing fetal tissue with Planned Parenthood staff are facing felony charges in California, for allegedly violating state law by filming people without their permission.

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced the charges against David Daleiden and Sandra Merritt on Tuesday, saying the state "will not tolerate the criminal recording of confidential conversations."

Lawmakers from both parties are increasingly convinced that the United States Senate is on a collision course that will permanently change the dynamics of the chamber — and the United States Supreme Court.

There's a growing bipartisan sadness and resignation about next week's showdown over the rules that govern high court nominations. But that doesn't mean there's any serious attempt from either party to avoid it.

After seven years of trying, Republicans failed to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act last week.

That doesn't mean the health care drama is over, though. House Speaker Paul Ryan this week told donors that the party is "going to keep getting at this thing," according to The Washington Post.

But whatever Ryan and his colleagues manage to do, plenty could still change in the Affordable Care Act. Last week's failed bill, after all, was only one part of the GOP's plan.

When it broadcasts the Winter Olympics from South Korea next year, NBC will do so with live programming across the U.S., bringing an end to the network's decades-old strategy of delaying coverage according to U.S. time zones.

Code Switch's Adrian Florido has been covering the new sanctuary movement for us. For this episode, he spoke to key players to understand why hundreds of churches are ready to start a public fight with the current administration to prevent deportations of immigrants living in the U.S. illegally.

He also looks at why the movement has to wrestle with important questions: Who controls the story and the message? How much say does an individual or family have in how a sanctuary church leverages their story?

Hillary Clinton criticized the lack of diversity in the Trump White House and the ill-fated Republican health care proposal in what were her most political public remarks since losing the November presidential election to Donald Trump.

Clinton made her observations in an address to the Professional BusinessWomen of California in San Francisco on Tuesday night. "There's no place I'd rather be than here with you," she told the gathering, adding, "other than the White House."

In Washington, D.C., U.S. Capitol Police say they have arrested an adult suspect after an incident Wednesday in which a driver "nearly struck" police officers and shots were fired.

The officers observed an "erratic and aggressive" driver near the U.S. Capitol on Independence Avenue at 9:22 a.m. ET and tried to carry out a traffic stop, Capitol Police communications Director Eva Malecki said in a statement to NPR.

Dear Mr. President: People Are Looking For Jobs

3 hours ago

Dear President Trump,

My name De’Andre Stringer. I’m a young man that is concerned about my city and my state. Knowing the idea that you are trying to make America great again, which is a very hard task and an idea that could be taken as a catchphrase with no action behind it.

But it’s not a catchphrase to me.

With making America great again you will be helping out cities with businesses and jobs. As you are getting ready to take office, I want to address some facts, concerns and suggestions to you in my region of Ohio.

Dear Mr President,

I hope my apprehension is unwarranted. Many are scared by what you have said in the past. What scares me most is the rhetoric of fear exploited by your campaign, by far the most divisive weapon to be deployed upon the public.

This country was built on the backs of immigrants and slaves and heroes that gave more than their due for the vision of something new -- a nation for all people, a democracy regardless of race or creed, responsible for their own destiny. The only outsiders here are those who do not share these principles.

Dear Mr. President: Relief For Chronic-Pain Sufferers

3 hours ago

Dear President Trump,

I am writing for myself and all others that suffer with chronic pain. The legislature has stopped our doctors from writing prescription drugs for long-term pain.

I have arthritis but that is not my biggest complaint. I have fibromyalgia, which is very painful and debilitating. It is so debilitating that I had to give up my career as a nurse because of its severity.

Bob Dylan will be accepting his Nobel Prize in Literature this weekend, according to the permanent secretary of the Swedish Academy. In a blog post Tuesday, Sara Danius announced the "good news" that members of the academy will be meeting with Dylan when he makes a tour stop in Stockholm.

After leaving the White House Ronald Reagan maintained an office in Los Angeles. It was a busy place; he met with dignitaries, celebrities, and ordinary Americans at his office. Peggy Grande was there, she became the former president's executive assistant, the person who managed his busy schedule. She got to know him quite well.

 

You'd think that a vaccine that protects people against more than a half dozen types of cancer would have patients lining up to get it. But the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, which can prevent roughly 90 percent of all cervical cancers as well as other cancers and sexually transmitted infections caused by the virus, has faced an uphill climb since its introduction more than a decade ago.

The family of President Trump's son-in-law and adviser, Jared Kushner, has called off talks with Chinese insurance company Anbang to redevelop a Manhattan office tower — a deal that raised ethical concerns.

"Kushner Companies is no longer in discussions with Anbang about 666 5th Avenue's potential redevelopment, and our firms have mutually agreed to end talks regarding the property," read a statement from the Kushner family. "Kushner Companies remains in active, advanced negotiations around 666 5th Avenue with a number of potential investors."

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday that the state of Texas has been using an unconstitutional and obsolete medical standard for determining whether those convicted of murder are exempt from the death penalty because of mental deficiency.

The 5-to-3 decision came in the case of Bobby James Moore, who killed a store clerk in Houston in 1980 during a botched robbery.

The fallout from Friday's Republican health care bill collapse is still trying to be understood.

Right after the bill was pulled, President Trump teased that he wanted to work with Democrats and believed a bipartisan bill would be possible.

But it wasn't clear if that was just talk. On Tuesday night, he may have taken the first step to trying to reach across the aisle.

U.S. nuclear energy company Westinghouse Electric has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, citing massive cost overruns in the construction of four nuclear power reactors in the U.S.

Westinghouse, a subsidiary of Japanese conglomerate Toshiba, says it has secured $800 million in financing as it goes through a "strategic restructuring." But that's just a fraction of the billions in losses it's expected to rack up this year.

Although it closed 60 years ago, Black Mountain College keeps on giving. In its heyday, the liberal arts institution near Asheville, N.C., counted many of the mid-century's great artistic thinkers, including John Cage, Willem de Kooning, Cy Twombly, Buckminster Fuller, Francine du Plessy Gray and Robert Rauschenberg, among its faculty and students.

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